Jump to content

R.I.P. Neil Armstrong...


Gubaba
 Share

Recommended Posts

Mr. Armstrong didn't go to some uncharted ocean or jungle. He left the bloody planet and was the first to set foot on another astral body. Now that is the ultimate "first!".

R.I.P.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rest in peace.

It's kind of odd that I was picturing this very situation only a couple of days ago. I was wondering how old Neil and Buzz must be now, and I figured that when they died, their deaths would and should be a big deal felt all over the world. What they managed I find incredible to this day. So far I haven't seen a huge reaction, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We can only fantasize about boldly going where no man has gone before, but this man did it then, and he's doing it yet again. Godspeed, man...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was laughing a lot to John Steward's (or someone elses, don't recall now, who...) jokes confusing Neil Armstrong and Lance Armstrong.... at the moment, i am not longer laughing. At All. (Salute)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To paraphrase another great historical figure: "Neil Armstrong has slipped the surly bonds of Earth, to touch the face of God.”

This world is now a dimmer place for his passing, one of the humblest pioneers to ever have lived, and an inspiration to all future explorers.

My condolences to his family, and a glorious salute to the man for a life well lived... Bravo, farewell, and Godspeed!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To paraphrase another great historical figure: "Neil Armstrong has slipped the surly bonds of Earth, to touch the face of God.”

This world is now a dimmer place for his passing, one of the humblest pioneers to ever have lived, and an inspiration to all future explorers.

My condolences to his family, and a glorious salute to the man for a life well lived... Bravo, farewell, and Godspeed!

He not only was who got the Final Frontier, but as extended to all humanity.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A reluctant hero who always believed he was just doing his job.

If it wasn't for my love of the space program and the inherent possibilities, I probably wouldn't be a fan of stuff like Macross and Gundam. And as a poster on Gundamn! put it, "Farewell Neil, your soul is no longer weighed down by gravity."

582787_377285552340850_1362668049_n.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Christopher Columbus, Charles Lindbergh, and Neil Armstrong.

Neil Armstrong.

He and his team in NASA achieved a giant leap for mankind.

They could do it not because they were easy, but because they were hard.

"This is Columbia. Signing off."

RIP.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

scary/depressing thought: there are now only 8 astronauts left who actually walked on the moon, all of whom are in their 70's. There's a very strong possibility that we'll all see the day when there won't be a single person alive on earth who has ever set foot on another celestial body.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's sad that the computing power of the now ubiquitous smart phone / laptop / or any consumer electronic device is several 1000x more powerful than Apollo 11's flight computer. Yet these guys, without the aid of many modern technological conveniences, traveled and set foot on the FRACKING moon, packed up, and made the return trip home.

Imagine what we could accomplish without wasting our bandwidth and CPU on Facebook/Twitter ,documenting details about our life that no ones gives two turds about.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tip my hat off to one of the greatest pioneers of our time and give my sincerest condolences to his family. While I was born quite some time after the last human set foot on the lunar surface, I hope I get the chance to see humans once again set foot on the celestial body someday. It's why I will always strongly support the space program and space exploration in general.

Rest in Peace sir.

Edited by Shadow
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was totally taken aback by this last night. I grew up surrounded by this, due to my dad's enthusiasm for it. Apollo models, the radio recordings on LP, Super8 reels of the landing...

Just wow. Farewell Neil, Godspeed.

(null)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I must admit I was in a bit of shocked to see Neil Armstrong's passing the other day, being one of the few humans ever to leave the Earth and walk on the Moon is an action few words can really describe, truly an experience only the very few could ever understand.

Godspeed Neil Armstrong. RIP

Link to comment
Share on other sites

RIP Neil Armstrong.

It pisses me off that suddenly there's a lot of talk in social forums about "Did we really go to the moon?" A lot people cannot fathom that with the technology of the 60's man was able to reach the Moon. Sad really.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

RIP Neil Armstrong.

It pisses me off that suddenly there's a lot of talk in social forums about "Did we really go to the moon?" A lot people cannot fathom that with the technology of the 60's man was able to reach the Moon. Sad really.

Too many people have watched "Capricorn One" and thought it was nonfiction, alas...

Link to comment
Share on other sites


  1. Since, with Neil Armstrong's death, everybody will be talking about the Apollo Mission to the moon, I thought I would put up this story about his Gemini 8 mission a few years earlier, which nearly proved to be fatal. They had just docked with the unmanned Agena docking ship when things started to go wrong.....
    "Emergency
    There was some suspicion on the ground that the Agena attitude system was acting up and might not have the correct program stored in it (this suspicion was subsequently found to be incorrect). Just before they went off contact with the ground, the crew of Gemini 8 were informed that if anything strange were to happen, they were to turn off the Agena.
    After the Agena began execution of its stored command program, which instructed the Agena to turn the combined spacecraft 90° to the right, Scott noticed that they were in a roll. Armstrong used the Gemini's Orbit Attitude and Maneuvering System (OAMS) to stop the roll, but the moment he stopped using the thrusters, it started again. They immediately turned off the Agena and this seemed to stop the problem for a few minutes. Then suddenly it started again.
    Scott noticed that the Gemini attitude fuel had dropped to 30% indicating that it was a problem on their own spacecraft. They would have to undock. After transferring control of the Agena back to the ground they undocked and with a long burst of translation thrusters moved away from the Agena.
    It was at that point that the Gemini spacecraft began to roll even faster, and approached one revolution per second. The astronauts were now in danger of impaired vision and loss of consciousness due to the violent motion. At this point Armstrong shut down the OAMS and used the Re-entry Control System reaction control system (RCS) to stop the spin. After steadying the spacecraft, they tested each OAMS thruster in turn and found that Number 8 had stuck on. Mission rules dictated that the flight be terminated once the RCS had been fired for any reason, so Gemini VIII prepared for an emergency landing."
    RIP Neil.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...