Jump to content

Science Fiction Books


shiroth
 Share

Recommended Posts

Going by the size alone of the story, yeah i had a feeling the film wouldn't be that good. Still it's something i wouldn't mind watching after i've done with the series.

I think John Clute said it best in the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction: "Parts of this bad film are close to masterful."

I still don't think it's worth it, but hey...whatever floats your boat. Just remember that it's one of Wanzerfan's favorite films. :ph34r:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's good to hear then. Could easily just read a little bit on Wikipedia before reading the books. They'll be added to the list, thanks again.

In the interest of saving you a couple bucks, the first six Ciaphas Cain novels and a handful of related short stories have been put into two big omnibus editions... Ciaphas Cain: Hero of the Imperium and Ciaphas Cain: Defender of the Imperium. There's also a seventh novel that just came out entitled The Emperor's Finest. If you're the cautious type, you can catch extracts of both omnibus editions and the new book here, here, and here respectively (in PDF format).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the interest of saving you a couple bucks, the first six Ciaphas Cain novels and a handful of related short stories have been put into two big omnibus editions... Ciaphas Cain: Hero of the Imperium and Ciaphas Cain: Defender of the Imperium. There's also a seventh novel that just came out entitled The Emperor's Finest. If you're the cautious type, you can catch extracts of both omnibus editions and the new book here, here, and here respectively (in PDF format).

Wow, thanks for the PDF links. I can at least preview and see what i think, and then go onto buying them. I've always been one who likes to own what he's reading after all.

Thanks again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Snow Crash, bu Neal Stephenson is hands down, my favorite book of all time. It's a great sci-fi novel, but it also imagines a United States that could be possible. Plus, in this virtual universe age, it's quite fitting. The characters are believable and the author has a kind of irreverent style. It's thoroughly enjoyable. I would also recommend most of William Gibsons books. Neuromancer (of course!), Mona Lisa Overdrive, Count Zero, Virtual Light, Idoru and All Tomorrow's Parties are tied together in two separate trilogies.

Edited by Capt Hungry
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think John Clute said it best in the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction: "Parts of this bad film are close to masterful."

I still don't think it's worth it, but hey...whatever floats your boat. Just remember that it's one of Wanzerfan's favorite films. :ph34r:

I for one appreciate how incredibly different the look & feel of the world of the lynch movie is. It's so foreign to me that I can imagine it being thousands of years in the future.

I just gave the disclaimer because I could see how the movie & miniseries both could turn people off. The book really destroys both of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Recently finished the enitre Dune saga, i now know why it so highly praised as a sci-fi masterpeice. The first 3 books are the best, even know ive seen the movie and mini-series before the only chracter from them that imagined only by head was Max von Sydow as Lyte Kynes. Leave ypou wanting more after Chapterhouse but not all that sure about reading the other none Herbert books.

Also read Armor by John Skeakley, thought that was a great Starship Troopers inspired action novel and Nightfall by Issac Asimov which might be the best sci-fi story ive read, which was done one sitting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Recently finished the enitre Dune saga, i now know why it so highly praised as a sci-fi masterpeice. The first 3 books are the best, even know ive seen the movie and mini-series before the only chracter from them that imagined only by head was Max von Sydow as Lyte Kynes. Leave ypou wanting more after Chapterhouse but not all that sure about reading the other none Herbert books.

Also read Armor by John Skeakley, thought that was a great Starship Troopers inspired action novel and Nightfall by Issac Asimov which might be the best sci-fi story ive read, which was done one sitting

I read those Dune sequels and prequels. They're immediately forgettable and add nothing to the mythology while the prequels actually contradict what's told in Dune in several instances.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read those Dune sequels and prequels. They're immediately forgettable and add nothing to the mythology while the prequels actually contradict what's told in Dune in several instances.

One of MY problems is that I had the Dune Encyclopedia (which, admittedly, is long out-of-print, and while Frank Herbert endorsed it, he also said in the introduction that he'd feel free to contradict it in future books, if need be), and, from my understanding, pretty much everything in that book was swept aside in order to make the prequels. Which of course is their right to do...but doesn't sound like anything I'd want to read.

My feeling is, the Dune books are not just cash-grab quickies, but genuine GOOD BOOKS, and worthy of study. As such, instead of cranking out tons of Dune-lite books, they should publish Frank Herbert's notes for Dune 7, either as an appendix to Chapterhouse, or as a short book on their own. Similar things are often done, but the one I'm thiking of is F. Scott Fitzgerald's final novel, The Last Tycoon, which incorporates all the chapters he had finished writing, and then goes on to present his summaries, outlines, and notes for the rest of the book. It's respectful, educational, honest, and classy. Why can't they do the same here?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't read many scifi novels except for a few from the Halo series: "The Flood" & "Fall of Reach". I seem to read more horror/suspense stories, and recently just finished Stephen King's "Misery". I also ordered the zombie survival guide and plan on reading that =P I know it doesn't count as scifi but what the hay.

Also I am currently writing a scifi novel I hope to have finished and published later next year. Those of you who know me, definitely know the inside info ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the interest of saving you a couple bucks, the first six Ciaphas Cain novels and a handful of related short stories have been put into two big omnibus editions... Ciaphas Cain: Hero of the Imperium and Ciaphas Cain: Defender of the Imperium. There's also a seventh novel that just came out entitled The Emperor's Finest. If you're the cautious type, you can catch extracts of both omnibus editions and the new book here, here, and here respectively (in PDF format).

I love Ciaphas Cain books! :lol: Very great fun injecting humour into the OH SO GRIM DARKNESS of the 41st Millenium. :lol:

I'd like to recommend the Ender Series, or at least just the 1st book, Ender's Game. Its like a sci-fi Harry Potter but the main protagonist is a genius kid with siblings hell bent on world domination amid an oncoming alien invasion of Gunbuster space monster proportions. Time dilation, warp and anti-matter bombs are in the mix. The later 3-4 books of the Ender series become abit more philosophical and even "religious" since Orson Scott Card seems to inject his mormonism in his sci-fi books.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For zombies, "World War Z" is pretty good, a book which took me a bit by surprise.

More Neal Stephenson - "Cryptonomicon" is one of those books that sort of falls between genres, but I think at least one reviewer did call it "the Citizen Kane of SF", or words to that effect, so it probably sneaks in here. If SF is a question of feel, then I think it qualifies.

I'm in a mixed mind about whether or not to mention Terry Pratchett - hes mostly known for his (wonderful) fantasy but he has written SF, probably the easiest one of which to start with would be "Only You Can Save Mankind". Though aimed at a slightly younger audience, I defy anyone not to read the passage about the "derelicts" and then look down at their hands and think "What have I done...?"... ^_^

Edited by F-ZeroOne
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

my son borrowed First Meetings in Ender's Universe from his school and promptly lost it. I ended up paying for it, found it years later after I kicked him out (he turned 20, so I kicked him out). Read it, and to date, I've read all the Ender novels and Bean novels.

What's next?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m having a great time reading the Horus Heresy books. "Legion", "First Heretic" and "Know no fear" have been very good. If you know a bit about the Warhammer 40k background they are nice reads.

Sorry that it is not high brow stuff but my capacity to concentrate has degraded a lot with my three year old running around the house… Since he started walking things have gone down hill faster and faster LOL

Edited by Twoducks
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There was a certain chapter in Ender's Game IMHO should have been omitted. Heck there's a stand alone book just based on that chapter also by Orson Scott Card.

Which chapter? The one where Bean was introduced?

I wish there was less nudity in it.

Edited by Einherjar
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Books I've read this year that could fall into this thread:

REAMDE - Neal Stephenson

Highly recommended, could be set only a few years in the future. Neal's going a bit more mainstream here than his usual SF, but for a number of reasons you could still call this SF 'lite'. Lots of interesting ideas though.

Blue Remembered Earth - Alaistair Reynolds

Still in the middle of this. It's okay. Not up to Reynolds usual calibre so far. My favourite Reynolds is Chasm City, and The Prefect.

Emphyrio - Jack Vance

I dearly love Jack Vance's books, written from the late seventies on. Earlier stuff is okay, but I do prefer his later work like Lyonesse. However, this - like the Dying Earth - is one of his early gems and a true SF classic. I had not read Emphyrio for some time, and to return is a bittersweet treat.

Children of the Sky - Vernor Vinge

Another author who's work I love, however I did not love his last book 'Rainbows End'. This new one is meant to be the sequel to 'A Fire Upon the Deep', one of the modern SF classics, and one of my favourite books. However, it's much less engrossing than the earlier work. Whereas the original told of a grand adventure in a strange but familiar universe, this one tells a story on a much smaller scale, focusing on the parts of A Fire Upon the Deep, that frankly, I was less engaged with. It's a fun read, but not a patch upon his earlier opus. I'm hoping this is part one of a trilogy, and the next two go to the places I miss.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I'm currently in the middle of reading the latest Honor Harrington novel Mission Of Honor. Its got a kind of calm before the storm going for it right now, with little action. That's not to say its boring, as its interesting to see various character interact, and seeing what might be a lasting peace established between Haven and Manticore all while the idiotic Sollies try to bring their outdated lumbering behmoth of a military to bare on the manties. Also Mesa is up to something very, very bad. Not sure what yet, but almost every chapter cuts to one of their ships setting something up as a timer counts down.

One final thought, how has this not become an anime?

Cute half asian woman as a main character Honor Harrington

Cute but deadly mascot character in the treecat Nimitz

Huge fleet battles with heavy emphasses on technology and tactics ala LoGH

Martial arts and sword combat with Katana's

Interstellar politics

Lite fanservice

Spaceships look like (censored)!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One final thought, how has this not become an anime?

With most of the characters looking like teenagers (due to anagathics in the universe) the look would be right. The usual anime hijinks would be out of place in the Honorverse though, and Nimitz does not really fall into the cute-pet-sidekick territory...

In addition to Honor I keep up with the Vorkosigan novels (all of them are excellent) and the "Lost Fleet" novels. I almost gave up on it after the first one but tried out the second and am now hooked, they get better as he goes along. Lots of space battles that really take communications lag at .2 light speed into account.

Finally I've been reading the Destroyermen series, a WWII era US destroyer ends up in an alternate universe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With most of the characters looking like teenagers (due to anagathics in the universe) the look would be right. The usual anime hijinks would be out of place in the Honorverse though, and Nimitz does not really fall into the cute-pet-sidekick territory...

I had Tytania, Legend of The Galactic Heroes, and Banner of the Stars in mind for this, not anything with "hijinks". In a way Nimitz does fit the cute sidekick territory. He often displays his "lil stinker" personality to the world and most dismiss him as a cute pet. Few realize how intelligent or dangerous he is, or his telepathic ability.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had Tytania, Legend of The Galactic Heroes, and Banner of the Stars in mind for this,

I'm just afraid they would not follow those particular examples... (also reminds me, I have to watch Legend)

On a seperate note, someone has to remind Webber that TALKING about space battles is not as fun as the battle itself. Luckily the last Honor novel cut down on the conference scenes, hopefully this bodes well for the next novel in his Armageddon Reef series as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The last chapter? I completely agree. It has an odd tone with respect to the rest of the book and added not much at all, for me at any rate.

Sequel hook? I guess for all the screwed up stuff Ender had to go through it needed to end on a good note at least. Although, I guess what people think of the rest of the franchise that followed ties into it alot. I've only read Speaker of the Dead and couple of chapters of Xenocide.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sequel hook? I guess for all the screwed up stuff Ender had to go through it needed to end on a good note at least. Although, I guess what people think of the rest of the franchise that followed ties into it alot. I've only read Speaker of the Dead and couple of chapters of Xenocide.

Well, it's been many years since I last read the book, but IIRC, yeah...the last chapter set up the following book, and (more importantly) made Ender face the atrocity he'd committed, and also gave him a way to atone for it.

As such, it's probably the most important chapter in the book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, it's been many years since I last read the book, but IIRC, yeah...the last chapter set up the following book, and (more importantly) made Ender face the atrocity he'd committed, and also gave him a way to atone for it.

As such, it's probably the most important chapter in the book.

agreed. Everything up to that point is an adolescent power fantasy, without that final chapter the book would be little more than a cartoon... with it, it's a classic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Children of the Sky - Vernor Vinge

Another author who's work I love, however I did not love his last book 'Rainbows End'. This new one is meant to be the sequel to 'A Fire Upon the Deep', one of the modern SF classics, and one of my favourite books. However, it's much less engrossing than the earlier work. Whereas the original told of a grand adventure in a strange but familiar universe, this one tells a story on a much smaller scale, focusing on the parts of A Fire Upon the Deep, that frankly, I was less engaged with. It's a fun read, but not a patch upon his earlier opus. I'm hoping this is part one of a trilogy, and the next two go to the places I miss.

A Deepness in the Sky was probably my favorite of his stuff. Haven't read the one you mention yet though.

I'm currently in the middle of reading the latest Honor Harrington novel Mission Of Honor. Its got a kind of calm before the storm going for it right now, with little action. That's not to say its boring, as its interesting to see various character interact, and seeing what might be a lasting peace established between Haven and Manticore all while the idiotic Sollies try to bring their outdated lumbering behmoth of a military to bare on the manties. Also Mesa is up to something very, very bad. Not sure what yet, but almost every chapter cuts to one of their ships setting something up as a timer counts down.

One final thought, how has this not become an anime?

Cute half asian woman as a main character Honor Harrington

Cute but deadly mascot character in the treecat Nimitz

Huge fleet battles with heavy emphasses on technology and tactics ala LoGH

Martial arts and sword combat with Katana's

Interstellar politics

Lite fanservice

Spaceships look like (censored)!

I gave up after about the fifth Harrington book. Seven chapters in of absolutely nothing happening made me want to throw the damn thing across the room (I would've too, except it was on my Kindle). The man's writing can be described as nothing less than turgid.

As for my own recomendations, you can't go wrong with Cordwainer Smith or Clifford D. Simak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Finished reading Mission of Honor a few weeks ago, pretty good read even if all hell has now broken loose. I just picked up the Gundam novels today, and plan on starting it tonight. Looking very forward to it being a very different take on the one year war even if I did find out some spoilers far in advance. I honestly thought I would never get my hands on them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reamde? Really? This was the man who wrote Snow Crash and Diamond Age? Diamond Age is absolutely brilliant- I think of it at least once a day when I hear about 3D printing and look at an ipad. This book is about the final result of both of these things, written way before they existed.

Reamde on the other hand is typing disguised as writing. He actually mocks himself during the book. Stephenson is actually using 'Skeletor' the over-prolific fantasy author as a negative foil for himself. It just went on and on and on. But I hear a lot of people liked the thing. People who also liked Crytonomicon. Blech.

Oh- American Gods by Neil Gaimon. Do yourself a favor and read that. Forget about Sandman and all that- read this for what it is. All ancient Gods have human "avatars" that walk around and live lives. Odin is a two-bit con artist. Loki is in the joint. Anansi is an old black storyteller dude. Brilliant and touching as hell.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Diamond Age was brilliant.

I think if you go into Reamde realising its 1) Not up to his usual standard & 2) Not science fiction, I think you'll enjoy it a lot more. By the time they had left China I realised what was going on, reduced my expectations and just kept along for the ride. I think the ending was particularly weak. But I still enjoyed it, and would recommend it.

For the record, I also like the Cryptonomicon! :)

Anyway, American Gods was quite good. I believe a movie is in development, but I could be wrong. Odin is perfectly realised! It could have done with a bit of tightening up though.

I believe theres's a Paulo Bagicalupi book coming out soon. I quite enjoyed his previous novel, so I'll give this one a go and report back once it's out.

Edited by PetarB
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...