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Big West trademarks Macross in the UK

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Macross Delta on Cartoon Network? Why not? :D

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1 hour ago, kajnrig said:

IIRC, most BDs are region-free. I don't know how/if that applies to anime distro companies, though. Let's hope that's the case.

My collection seems to be pretty mixed in that regard... though it seems to vary by distributor.

I'm not sure if it's still an issue, but for a while there the Japanese studios were vocally concerned about the possibility of losing profits from home video sales to fans importing the less expensive western home video releases of their shows.

 

38 minutes ago, Bolt said:

And is HG part of the reason Macross hasn’t (yet) gone full saturation bombing lame anime , sell,sell,sell models.. 

[...]

Are we gonna regret our big ape finally getting off skull island..?

Gundam's focus was always selling model kits... Macross's is on selling music.

Macross Delta is, if anything, proof that Macross has ALREADY succumbed to the "saturation bombing" effect of focusing on the profit center at the expense of the story.

 

5 minutes ago, AN/ALQ128 said:

I don't see Macross turning into another Gundam yet, since its still primarily under the stewardship of Kawamori.

Kawamori has, IIRC, expressed some frustration already that he's tied to a formula for Macross titles that includes a love triangle, music, and space war.

It's just not as bad as Gundam, which has evolved its Universal Century to the point that new shows are basically written mad lib-style.

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, Seto Kaiba said:

Gundam's focus was always selling model kits... Macross's is on selling music.

Macross Delta is, if anything, proof that Macross has ALREADY succumbed to the "saturation bombing" effect of focusing on the profit center at the expense of the story.

Good point. The idol dollar is already in place in Japan. Out west though..it might be selling more models..I don’t see Walkure taking the world by storm. But who knows , maybe all these millennials will gobble it up :lol:

 

12 minutes ago, Seto Kaiba said:

Kawamori has, IIRC, expressed some frustration already that he's tied to a formula for Macross titles that includes a love triangle, music, and space war.

I’ve read this as well. Which has left me with the impression, Kawamori San isn’t really pulling the strings so much as being told where and how to focus his ideas..

I’m not sure ( but I really don’t know) Kawamori San is writing his own checks..

So then he gets approached by Chinese money and does Pandora..

 

Edited by Bolt

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14 minutes ago, Seto Kaiba said:

It's just not as bad as Gundam, which has evolved its Universal Century to the point that new shows are basically written mad lib-style.

This is what I fear..

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59 minutes ago, Bolt said:

Good point. The idol dollar is already in place in Japan. Out west though..it might be selling more models..I don’t see Walkure taking the world by storm. But who knows , maybe all these millennials will gobble it up :lol:

Yeah, if Macross were to take off bigtime in the west I'd expect to see music mildly deemphasized towards a more balanced story like Macross Frontier.  

Gundam's plastic model kits cross barriers of language and culture a lot more easily than Macross's J-Pop albums, but music is so essential to the Macross experience and core themes that they can't deemphasize it very much without hurting the setting and story.

 

59 minutes ago, Bolt said:

I’ve read this as well. Which has left me with the impression, Kawamori San isn’t really pulling the strings so much as being told where and how to focus his ideas..

Frankly, I'd be shocked if Kawamori didn't have a raft of studio executives, production committee members, and assorted hangers-on auditing his concepts and proposals to make sure what he's coming up with is actually marketable.  It's very rare for a creator to actually be given a completely free hand to do whatever they please, and on the rare occasions that they do get complete control it almost never ends well.  

 

Spoiler

For instance, Star Trek would've been a disaster if Gene Roddenberry hadn't had a small army of producers, co-producers, consultants, and writers led by Gene Coon, Bob Justman, D.C. Fontana, and Matt Jeffries willing to stand up to him, tell him when his ideas weren't workable, and forcibly bridge the gap between Roddenberry's ideals and reality.  They all too often don't get the credit they deserve because Roddenberry was disinclined to credit them for their contributions.  When Gene finally did get a largely free hand to do as he pleased, it led to the notoriously awful first season of Star Trek: the Next Generation because Gene refused to let the writers have any conflict between the regular cast.  The network couldn't wrestle control away from Roddenberry fast enough thereafter.

Likewise, Star Wars's early incarnations were so terrible Harrison Ford notably told him"George, you can type this crap but you sure can't say it!  Move your mouth when you're typing."  It became the classic it is because the studio and producers kept Lucas on a VERY short leash and the film's budgetary constraints forced them to get creative with a good deal of the practical and special effects.  When Lucas was given carte blanche to do a new trilogy however he pleased, we ended up with the prequels... and the idea he had for a sequel trilogy (basically a three part Star Wars version of Fantastic Voyage) was even worse than what we got from Disney.

Gundam had some issues with Yoshiyuki Tomino along similar lines, most recently with Reconguista in G.

 

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50 minutes ago, Seto Kaiba said:

Frankly, I'd be shocked if Kawamori didn't have a raft of studio executives, production committee members, and assorted hangers-on auditing his concepts and proposals to make sure what he's coming up with is actually marketable.  It's very rare for a creator to actually be given a completely free hand to do whatever they please, and on the rare occasions that they do get complete control it almost never ends well.   

I wonder how "hands on" Kawamori actually is in regards to the episode-by-episode workings of a TV anime.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Seto Kaiba said:

I'm not sure if it's still an issue, but for a while there the Japanese studios were vocally concerned about the possibility of losing profits from home video sales to fans importing the less expensive western home video releases of their shows.

So, this has always been a little confusing to me.  Why exactly are the Japanese video releases so much more expensive than the exported versions?

Is it related to the initial domestic sales being used as an immediate way to deliver profit to their investors?  I can see that being a big thing, and that would basically mean the series has to turn a profit in domestic sales, before an international release is even considered.  Once to that point, the export releases would probably be priced just to cover the cost of translation, marketing and distribution.

I'm not sure how exactly that threatens the profits of the domestic release though, unless the international ones happen very quickly afterward, or if they announce that it will happen before the Japanese version is on shelves.  

I can understand why they would be hesitant to try to account for international sales in their business model though.  Expecting foreign fans to have enough interest in a series to help fund it is a huge gamble.

Edited by Chronocidal

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, AN/ALQ128 said:

I wonder how "hands on" Kawamori actually is in regards to the episode-by-episode workings of a TV anime.

@Seto Kaiba  I believe is correct on that point, concerning the mob that oversees Kawamori San’s Lead.

As far as how “hands on”. I believe Kawamori San is very hands on, once he’s given approval and stays within the holy trinity . I  know he’s stuck to his guns on certain writing aspects and ideas,such as the repressed memory concept Guld was suffering from in M+.  And even the design of Sharon apple, as it didn’t seem too appealing to the rest of the production crew..I’m sure , as he’s said, Kawamori has many more ideas for Macross. Let’s see how much they are affected by these changing times..

Edited by Bolt

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37 minutes ago, Chronocidal said:

So, this has always been a little confusing to me.  Why exactly are the Japanese video releases so much more expensive than the exported versions?

Mostly, it's the small expected sales volumes and narrow profit margins.

As I understand it, physical media is a bit of a specialty market in Japan.  The average home in Japan is fairly small by western standards, and with space at a bit of a premium it can be inconvenient or just plain impractical to build a large home video library.  This has kept the video rental industry alive and well in Japan and in so doing kept the expected sales of any given home video release on the low side.  Prices are set higher, in part, to compensate for the lower expected total sales.  That fans were still willing to buy physical media those high prices meant there really wasn't an incentive to try lowering them. 

It certainly doesn't help that anime is made on such razor-thin margins that home video sales and merchandise are downright essential to a show's commercial success or failure.  The studios stay afloat on the profits from the few hits they put out year to year, with most of what they produce barely breaking even or resulting in a short-term loss that may or may not be recouped by a slow trickle of profit from years of merchandise, streaming licensing, international licensing, and back catalog home video sales.  With such a narrow margin between turning a profit or writing off a loss, the higher price means fewer units need to be sold to break even.

 

37 minutes ago, Chronocidal said:

I'm not sure how exactly that threatens the profits of the domestic release though, unless the international ones happen very quickly afterward, or if they announce that it will happen before the Japanese version is on shelves.  

They do announce them fairly quickly these days, but even if they don't the massive disparity in price could easily entice a savvy Japanese fan to purchase a Blu-ray from America for a fraction of what the Japanese domestic market release would cost.

Consider, if you will... the average Japanese Blu-ray disc costs about $64 (US) and typically has three TV series episodes on it.  That's $21.25 an episode.  Macross Delta was a bit more expensive at $71.91 a volume for nine volumes/26 episodes plus various cuts of episode one, and cost over $647 when all was said and done.  Getting a 26 episode anime series on Blu-ray in the US?  $52.50 including the average sales tax.  That's $2.02 an episode... a savings of 91.88%.  In terms of spending power, importing the American Blu-ray would save a Japanese fan enough money for: 140 gallons of gasoline, two inexpensive Windows 10 laptops, a reasonably high-end smartphone, 185 cans of Coke, 21 dinners out, or approximately a month's rent in a typical 2K or 2DK apartment.

Savings-wise, that's nothing to sneeze at... especially with Blu-ray prices creeping up towards $72/volume and some of the more popular shows having more than 26 episodes.  Even the limited low-priced edition Macross 7 Blu-rays cost over $500 for the complete series, at about $9.93 an episode. 

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I was told at a convention in Paris, that European distributors, even UK ones, have more freedom with their pricing and subtitling, since European BD's are on a different code to Japan's unlike the US. That is why series like Madoka and the Monogatari series are almost twice as expensive with the american Aniplex releases than their UK counterparts. Yes, they have more extras and booklets and the like, but hardly to justify the difference in price

There's some other tidbits in US releases like not being able to remove the English subtitles when listening to the original japanese audio. I suppose that's also to remove the possibility of reverse export.

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