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Well, this looks rather scary: Quotes from: http://atmelcorporation.wordpress.com/2014/07/26/hoverbikes-may-soon-become-a-reality

“We combined the simplicity of a motorbike and the freedom of a helicopter to create the world’s first flying motorcycle,” says a company rep.

The futuristic prototype has the potential to travel up to 92 miles or for about 45 minutes on a single tank of fuel, with a 3,048-meter maximum altitude and a top speed of around 45 MPH. “This a far cry from the full-size prototype’s theorized 173 MPH,” writes Wired’s Chris Higgins.

http://www.hover-bike.com/MA/

How the heck are they going to pass safety!?!!! :)

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I believe the vanes you see inside the fan ducts are movable to provide stability/control. Also, if the experience of the Hiller flying platform is anything to go by, a lifting fan arrangement is self-stabilizing to a great (excessive?) degree.

EDIT: Actually, upon closer examination the vanes don't seem to have hinges, but the photo of the one doing a tethered test seems like it might show some control surfaces below the rear fan.

Edited by Nekko Basara
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I believe the vanes you see inside the fan ducts are movable to provide stability/control. Also, if the experience of the Hiller flying platform is anything to go by, a lifting fan arrangement is self-stabilizing to a great (excessive?) degree.

EDIT: Actually, upon closer examination the vanes don't seem to have hinges, but the photo of the one doing a tethered test seems like it might show some control surfaces below the rear fan.

I didn't see those control surfaces. Good spot.

I also began to consider certifying for safety, since I don't see how this could work in a one-engine-out condition. Went to their website and saw that their most recent prototype design is actually a quad-copter with partially overlapping fans. This seems more stable and definitely a step in the right direction.

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Who needs safety?

Ha! I guess that's one way to view it! :)

if it worked for Zeon...

That Zeon unit looks a heck of a lot safer with the VOTOMs or zaku helmet placed over the fans.

I believe the vanes you see inside the fan ducts are movable to provide stability/control. Also, if the experience of the Hiller flying platform is anything to go by, a lifting fan arrangement is self-stabilizing to a great (excessive?) degree.

Funny - you can actually see a Hiller flying platform (mockup?) at the Hiller Aviation Museum in San Carlos, CA. http://www.hiller.org/flying-platform.shtml. You can even try out a sim of the controls but I was never able to "fly" it without crashing.

I also began to consider certifying for safety, since I don't see how this could work in a one-engine-out condition. Went to their website and saw that their most recent prototype design is actually a quad-copter with partially overlapping fans. This seems more stable and definitely a step in the right direction.

Looks more like a quad-copter drone. Still tons of safety issues: slowing down/breaking, objects caught in the blades, exploding blades, pilot safety in crash, etc. Neat project though! I hope they succeed.

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Funny - you can actually see a Hiller flying platform (mockup?) at the Hiller Aviation Museum in San Carlos, CA. http://www.hiller.org/flying-platform.shtml. You can even try out a sim of the controls but I was never able to "fly" it without crashing.

Cool!

Last summer I was thrilled to see one at the Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air & Space Museum; you can see their page for it here. They didn't have any simulator for it, but they did have several other weird vertical flight prototypes.

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Last summer I was thrilled to see one at the Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air & Space Museum; you can see their page for it here. They didn't have any simulator for it, but they did have several other weird vertical flight prototypes.

Nice! I went back and re-read the Hiller page and those are the only two of the six actual platforms that exsit! They don't know the whereabouts of the other four:

"Of the six Flying Platforms that were built, the (ONR) vehicle is on exhibit at the Hiller Aviation Museum, and the National Air & Space Museum has a 1031-A-1."

I haven't been to the Air & Space in decades but absolutely love it! I always get sucked in when I'm in the vicinity, and only have an hour or two afterwards to see the rest of the Smithsonian! :rolleyes: Hope to make it there again sometime. :)

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