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thenoyb
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Totally new to modeling. I have a lot of kits that I would like to start building, but am overwhelmed with all the tools needed to do it right. So my questions to the group is what are some basic tool (pain, cements, brushes, ect...) that you suggest I get?

Thanks

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A tool set would be a good start. Probably won't need to use the screwdrivers all that much, but they are nice to have. In addition to that set, go to your local drug store, and in the beauty section check out the emery boards for nail smoothing. Those work great for smoothing out excess plastic on your parts.

Probably want to get yourself a paint brush set, too. Paints, that will have to be your decision. There are 3 mains types of model paints- acrylic, enamel, and lacquer. Also where you're located will have an impact on what you use. I use Mr. Color from GSI Creos. Lacquer based, so its fumes can be pretty nasty, but it dries super fast, and is pretty tough. Thing is, I think it's real hard to get it outside of Japan. I'm sure others will add their paint opinions.

For the glue I use, I like Tamiya Extra Thin and Mr. Cement Deluxe

Hope this helps!

Oh, and here's everything I've built recently.

Edited by Jefuemon
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Totally new to modeling. I have a lot of kits that I would like to start building, but am overwhelmed with all the tools needed to do it right. So my questions to the group is what are some basic tool (pain, cements, brushes, ect...) that you suggest I get?

Thanks

Ultimately what kind of model kit you intend to work on will define what kit you get for your kit. If it's the HG Gundam kits, then all you really need is a sharp knife. Maybe a pair of tweezers.

The ultimate basics are:

- modelling glue (there are a lot of choices with different drying times and effects on the plastic, but for - beginners the most commonly available types will suffice)

- modelling knife (recommend X-Acto)

- fine-point brush (med. etc. are also useful)

- modelling paint (at least red, yellow, blue, black & white)

- paint thinner

after that, everything else in your kit should be readily available in your house or easy to fashion from things in your house (ie water bowls & cotton ear swabs for decals).

I've found the following helpful:

- nippers (handy tool for cutting parts from sprues, try to get one that has flat, relatively thin cutting blades)

- tweezers

- oil-based fine nibbed art pen (essentially what a Gundam Marker amounts to without the brand name and it's costs. Apparently a diluted sumi (Japanese calligraphy ink) wash and wipe will have similar effects. Haven't tried it personally... mechanical pencil lead apparently also works, but you've got to seal the model afterwards...)

- super glue (Japanese modelling magazines indicate it as a useful alternative when gluing the really small pieces that have small points of contact)

A bunch of those basic and helpful tools are in Jefuemon's recommended tool kit, but it may be faster, cheaper and you may ultimately end up with higher quality tools if you don't buy an imported tool kit, and instead visit your local hardware and drug stores for the tools you need, when you need them.

I've built a bunch of snap-together Gundam, Macross and Yamato kits over the past few years, and I've rarely used glue, let alone screwdrivers (all of once, if memory serves, and a jewellers kit sufficed).

Files (or sand paper in my case), modelling putty and paint? Haven't used any of those.

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If you're doing resin kits, and you want to put a metal pin between the major pieces - what's good for that? It should be barely bendable correct? So you can drill the hole in each part, then put them together, bend it into exact position and super glue in place?

not sure why the pin should bend at all. if the parts are tricky to mate in the exact position, one could make the pin holes a little loose so that there's enough play to move the parts, fill the holes with epoxy or slow curing super glue, mate and position as desired, then clamp/secure in place. for that purpose, any rigid piece of metal will do, for example, finishing nails.

if it really needs to be bendable, then maybe copper tubes/rods. brass if it needs to be stiffer.

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Ah, before I forget, you need the following:

- time

- well lit, well ventilated (if you're using glue and/or paints), flat, level area.

- patience (better to take a break when frustrated then try to force things or rush to finish a step)

- realistic expectations

That last one is probably the most important. We all dream of producing jaw-dropping awesomeness like the kit in Jefuemon's post, but it's extremely unlikely that you're going to do that on the first try. It's probably best to start with a cheap starter kit (one that you can afford to throw away if things go sideways), and start it expecting that it'll end up in a mess.

Once you've figured out your ability level, then you can start to expect awesomeness.

Edited by sketchley
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not sure why the pin should bend at all. if the parts are tricky to mate in the exact position, one could make the pin holes a little loose so that there's enough play to move the parts, fill the holes with epoxy or slow curing super glue, mate and position as desired, then clamp/secure in place. for that purpose, any rigid piece of metal will do, for example, finishing nails.

if it really needs to be bendable, then maybe copper tubes/rods. brass if it needs to be stiffer.

Understood - sounds good...

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- realistic expectations

That last one is probably the most important. We all dream of producing jaw-dropping awesomeness like the kit in Jefuemon's post,

Thank you. Guess I should have also mentioned I've been building off and on for close to 30 years, too...

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I agree. Most important tools all start with your mindset. Time and patience, then all the other stuff, glues ( I use zap a gap) Paints (testors and citadel) exacto blades, tweezers. A table or workdesk (my kitchen table)

If you want to, you can get an airbrush. I got mine at Michaels at a clearance sale. $20.00. Then my wife got a half off coupon and I picked up a dual action for $40.

Usually, I would recommend you start with a low skill level kit to get your feet wet.

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