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This was one episode I found (and still do find) fascinating. The idea behind the Dyson sphere is just so cool to me. I only wish they had a way larger budget and current CGI to show it more than it was shown in the show. If you think about the sheer size of it, ALL of the blackness of space should have always been filled in full screen with grey surface detail anytime the Ent D was on screen! Like one huge wall of grey that never stopped. Good episode. The scene with Scotty and Picard in the holodeck on the Ent A bridge drinking the whiskey is one of my favs. 

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2 hours ago, derex3592 said:

This was one episode I found (and still do find) fascinating. The idea behind the Dyson sphere is just so cool to me. I only wish they had a way larger budget and current CGI to show it more than it was shown in the show. If you think about the sheer size of it, ALL of the blackness of space should have always been filled in full screen with grey surface detail anytime the Ent D was on screen! Like one huge wall of grey that never stopped. Good episode. The scene with Scotty and Picard in the holodeck on the Ent A bridge drinking the whiskey is one of my favs. 

 

 

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I'm currently under the weather so i don't feel the urge to verify this but did the Klingon Death Scream originate on TNG early enough that the possibility of it being depicted in VI could have occurred, had the knowledge pass from the TNG film crew to the VI Film crew?

 

What kind of reaction would 1990 audiences would have to it? (More importantly, what if they intentionally did not do it?)

Edited by TehPW
Very....Verify: Very, very Ugh atm.
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1 hour ago, TehPW said:

I'm currently under the weather so i don't feel the urge to verify this but did the Klingon Death Scream originate on TNG early enough that the possibility of it being depicted in VI could have occurred, had the knowledge pass from the TNG film crew to the VI Film crew?

Sorry to hear you're unwell.  I hope you feel better soon. :)

To answer your question... yes, the Klingon death ritual first appeared in Star Trek: the Next Generation episode 01x20 "Heart of Glory" about two-and-a-half years before Nicholas Meyer and Denny Martin Flinn delivered the filming script for Star Trek VI: the Undiscovered Country.  TNG Season 1's "Heart of Glory" had its broadcast debut on 21 March 1988.  Exact dates are not available, but Meyer and Flinn started writing Star Trek VI in 1990 and handed in the final script by October of that year, with production starting 13 February 1991.  

 

1 hour ago, TehPW said:

What kind of reaction would 1990 audiences would have to it? (More importantly, what if they intentionally did not do it?)

Hard to say.  "Heart of Glory" got roughly average ratings for a TNG Season 1 episode on its first broadcast (~10.7M) and it was nominated for Emmy consideration (in the editing category).  Opinion of the episode among the cast and crew is pretty mixed, and later reviewers tend to point out the death ritual as one of the episode's sillier moments.

I would assume its omission was probably intentional, because the film's priorities were elsewhere.

Where Star Trek: the Next Generation was essentially trying to move past the use of the Klingons and hostilities with them as an allegory for the Russians and the Cold War and give them their own unique cultural identity, Meyer and Flinn's script for Star Trek VI: the Undiscovered Country went in precisely the opposite direction because it was inspired by current events.  At the time Meyer and Flinn started writing Star Trek VI, the Soviet Union was creaking under the strain of the Chernobyl cleanup, the increasing internal conflicts among its member republics, and demands for governmental and electoral reforms.  Since Star Trek grew, in part, out of Cold War tensions envisioning an end to the Space Cold War they had created for their story was a fitting swan song for the TOS cast.  They just didn't realize how prophetic they were about it, with the film accidentally depicting the Empire's slide into collapse and a military coup against the Klingon head of state with a similar collapse and coup happened in Russia for similar reasons while the film was in production.  Throwing the post-allegorical Klingon death ritual from TNG's first season into the film would probably have undermined the sledgehammer-unsubtle allegory by making the Klingons more alien.

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On 11/27/2022 at 10:29 PM, sh9000 said:

 

"Schisms" was a weird one.

One of the few times Star Trek has tried to do more or less straight-up horror.  They never figure out who the aliens are, why they're capturing people and subjecting them to all of those invasive medical experiments, or really manage to stop them from carrying on.  In a way, it feels like they should've come back to that one at some point.  Kind of like those parasites from TNG season 1 that were teased as a continuing threat and then were never mentioned again.

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2 hours ago, Seto Kaiba said:

One of the few times Star Trek has tried to do more or less straight-up horror.  They never figure out who the aliens are, why they're capturing people and subjecting them to all of those invasive medical experiments, or really manage to stop them from carrying on.  In a way, it feels like they should've come back to that one at some point.  Kind of like those parasites from TNG season 1 that were teased as a continuing threat and then were never mentioned again.

THIS! Right HERE! Totally should have spun it somehow that the two were interconnected somehow!  Still, I like this epiosode, it's just CREEEEPY AF. Kinda like a good old X-Files episode! 

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3 hours ago, Seto Kaiba said:

"Schisms" was a weird one.

One of the few times Star Trek has tried to do more or less straight-up horror.  They never figure out who the aliens are, why they're capturing people and subjecting them to all of those invasive medical experiments, or really manage to stop them from carrying on.  In a way, it feels like they should've come back to that one at some point.  Kind of like those parasites from TNG season 1 that were teased as a continuing threat and then were never mentioned again.

Well, they could always use those in ST:P S3; it's better than fighting on trashbag-covered sets or downtown LA. :p

 

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On 11/29/2022 at 9:18 PM, derex3592 said:

THIS! Right HERE! Totally should have spun it somehow that the two were interconnected somehow!  Still, I like this epiosode, it's just CREEEEPY AF. Kinda like a good old X-Files episode! 

I'm not sure interconnecting those two would work... they don't really have any themes in common except having been horror episodes.

The parasites from "Conspiracy" were originally a part of a larger story arc, but they ended up orphaned from it because the budget wouldn't stretch to doing proper insectoid aliens and the idea was workshopped into the Borg.

The aliens from "Schisms" were just this weird one-off thing that shows up, menaces a few crew members on the Enterprise, and then disappear and are never mentioned again.

 

Spoiler

The Star Trek relaunch novelverse did attempt to tie up both of those loose ends, in hacky ways.

The unnamed parasites from "Conspiracy" were workshopped into the Kurlans, mutated (and insane) Trill symbionts from a failed genetic engineering experiment created early in Trill's space colonization.  They were supposed to be symbionts that could be removed and exchanged without harming the host.  They ended up being parasites that dominated the mind of the host completely.  The Trill tried to destroy them by bombing Kurl into a wasteland, and their whole plot in "Conspiracy" and several original novelverse stories is a silent takeover of key positions in Starfleet and/or the Federation Council in order to use the Federation's resources to destroy Trill.

The aliens from "Schisms" were presented as invaders from another dimension fleeing the collapse of their home reality in one of the Titan novels.

 

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1 hour ago, sh9000 said:

 

The best part of "Rascals" isn't even in "Rascals"...

It's in DS9's "Bar Association":

Not only is "Rascals" the first TNG episode Odo references... Odo had that PADD just sitting there.  WAITING.  In case Worf came in to complain about security!

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