Jump to content

At 24 years of age what did you accomplish.


Recommended Posts

I'd already finished my undergrad degree and gotten married, but by 24 the farthest I'd gotten in my career was working at a Gamestop (that may or may not have still been a Software Etc at the time).  Honestly, aside from the aforementioned bachelor's degree and marriage, I can't say my 20s were particularly productive at all.  I didn't get my masters, start doing a "real" job in IT, or have a kid until my 30s.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I already finished my apprenticeship as a plumber so that is something. Roughly around my 24th birthday I started my WoW career for a couple of years. You could say I achieved quite a bit in that game until I quit in 2012. :p

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I partied my arse off through my 20's. I wouldn't trade it for anything. I had a great time at the best age to do it.:good:

I didn't accomplish anything of note until I was 30 and opened up a motorcycle dealership/was a pro roadracer..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At 24, I was taught the hard lesson that putting all your eggs into the "dream job" at the prestigious accounting firm isn't all its cracked up to be.  That there's more to life than just THE CAREER.  You study your whole life, get the good grades, go on to college, and get that top job. . . and have nothing else to show for it.

Had to be taught that lesson later again for that message to finally sink in.

Don't get me wrong:  I'm thankful for the career I chose (and the pay that comes with it). 

BUT I enjoy spending time with my family, having time to dork around on this message board, and being able to actually take most federal holidays off (seriously, screw coming into work on President's Day just because it's "busy season.").

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Mog said:

At 24, I was taught the hard lesson that putting all your eggs into the "dream job" at the prestigious accounting firm isn't all its cracked up to be.  That there's more to life than just THE CAREER.  You study your whole life, get the good grades, go on to college, and get that top job. . . and have nothing else to show for it.

Had to be taught that lesson later again for that message to finally sink in.

Don't get me wrong:  I'm thankful for the career I chose (and the pay that comes with it). 

BUT I enjoy spending time with my family, having time to dork around on this message board, and being able to actually take most federal holidays off (seriously, screw coming into work on President's Day just because it's "busy season.").

You know I miss the days when companies rewarded loyalty. When they appreciated you staying late and coming in on weekends to help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ehh, it's always been "just business" and about money.  That whole benign company is just PR (reminds me of the good joke about hell and recruiting).

Back in my younger days, I used to use the phrases "Work hard; play hard" and "That's just the nature of the beast" to justify/explain why I worked that much.

Nowadays?  I'm under no delusions about company loyalty.  I'll do the job and help out.  But there are things far, FAR more important than the job.  No one's ever said on their deathbed, "I wish I worked more and gave more of my time to the company!!111!!!"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

By that age I had gained the majority custody of my daughter. I probably raised her on too many action movies and and shows and maybe not enough cooking and girly stuff. But I always had someone to go to the movies with. Her friends were just giving her crap about never watching princess diaries and she had to explain that she was usually watching Galaxy Quest, or Mad Max or something 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Mog said:

Ehh, it's always been "just business" and about money.  That whole benign company is just PR (reminds me of the good joke about hell and recruiting).

Back in my younger days, I used to use the phrases "Work hard; play hard" and "That's just the nature of the beast" to justify/explain why I worked that much.

Nowadays?  I'm under no delusions about company loyalty.  I'll do the job and help out.  But there are things far, FAR more important than the job.  No one's ever said on their deathbed, "I wish I worked more and gave more of my time to the company!!111!!!"

 

Nah, South Africa was different back in the day, although it depended on who your managers were as it always does. People worked for their companies for life and were treated almost like family. Being fired was a big thing.

Nowadays if you're the right colour and have skills you job hop frequently for more money.

If you're the wrong colour you cling to your job for dear life (if you're even lucky enough to get one.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Podtastic
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeez... I try not to think about 24.  Bad times. 😅

By that point in my life, I'd finished my undergraduate degrees and was halfway into a Master's.  That was the year the evil empire up in Redmond let me and like 1,500 other software engineers go due to the recession and I had to scramble to find another job while looking after my mentally ill grandmother and my engagement broke up.  That was also the year I'd filed for my first patent, though I don't think it was granted until early the following year.  That was an unpleasant year... and so were the next three.

 

6 hours ago, Podtastic said:

You know I miss the days when companies rewarded loyalty. When they appreciated you staying late and coming in on weekends to help.

Company loyalty died with the concept of the Defined Benefit Pension.

When companies no longer thought it was worth it to buy your loyalty long-term with the promise of a guaranteed retirement with benefits, the general attitude toward employment became a mercenary one where loyalty is rented by the highest bidder for as long as they're willing to pay and no longer.

 

Edited by Seto Kaiba
Link to comment
Share on other sites

At 50, I can't say I've accomplished anything of note within the entirety of my life, but at 24, I was a Senior Airman, or a newly minted Staff Sergeant in the Air Force working hydraulics and aerial refueling systems on MC-130E Hercules aircraft out of Hurlburt Fld, Fl. I had some fun experiences during that period of time, as we went to some cool places and did some neat things. When I was about 25, Hollywood used our plane 64-0559 to film scenes for Air Force One. We never met any of the film's stars, but doing the filming was a memorable experience on its own, especially when filming scenes with the 747- we flew with the ramp down, and reeled out a 200 lb dummy dressed in a suit to represent Harrison, which was AF property then used for Fulton Recovery System training, to film the scenes when he's dangling on a cable in front of the 747's number two engine towards the end of the film. Had that cable snapped, it would have been catastrophic. Fortunately, all went well. Those of us who went out to do the filming also got an advanced screening of the film, which was pretty cool. The movie hasn't held up well, IMHO, but I still have good memories of our stay in Ventura while we did the filming. Incidentally, at the time, Rick Springfield of "Jessie's Girl" fame had a tv show where he played a cop or something, and they were filming an episode for the entirety of the two weeks we were staying there. Didn't meet Rick, but the British fellow playing that ep's baddie was a really personable guy. No idea what his name was.  While they were filming a scene, I was hanging out by the sound guy, and he handed me his headphones while they were doing a live take- just incredible fidelity- it picked up everything. Cool experience that I'll never forget.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Released 6th CD and started to tour around the US doing music shows. Mostly college campuses and clubs. A few larger venues of about 1k capacity. Epic times and stories galore. Had a second a few years later and realized I would die much happier as an involved father over a musician. 

 

Joined to serve, and still do. A few tours in a less hospitable locations. Children are almost all grown and about to be an empty nester. 

 

Time for the next phase and Macross has been one of the only constants through it all..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At 24 (well a bit earlier, perhaps 22) I picked up a copy of the Sega Saturn Macross: Do You Remember Love game, and had a blast playing it. I remember moments of confusion as somehow some of the cutscenes in the game were not what I remembered of the Macross TV show, and it was only much later I realized there was a Macross DYRL movie. It was then a series of more pleasant discoveries finding out the very cool opening cinematic of the game was made exclusively for the game, and even much later after discovering DYRL, the Minmay concert credits scene in the game was lifted from FB2012. 

Hmm accomplishment? Well, I finished the game ^_^

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/15/2021 at 12:22 AM, Beltane70 said:

Other than taking a trip to Japan when I was 21, the only other thing that I accomplished by 24 was being a member of the staff for a now defunct anime convention. 

I was stationed at Kadena, Okinawa as my first base. I was a bout 20 when I showed up, and about 22 when I departed. Unlike the vast majority of my military brethren, I never cottoned to alcohol or parties, and I remained quite antisocial.  My second year there, the Air Force underwent a complete organizational restructuring, and as a result, my little F-15 component backshop merged with the old SAC backshop. One of the guys who transferred over was an older Tech Sergeant, who became a mentor and friend to both myself and my roommate, also in his early twenties, who also worked with me in the shop.  The three of us would often jump in my car and we'd go sight-seeing around the island. I was very much an introvert, very small-minded, having come from a rather conservative and sheltered upbringing, and having those adventures with both of my friends, both of whom were far more worldly than me, helped to open me up a bit. So, that little bit of growth was an accomplishment before 24.  Too, I got pretty good at testing F-15 PRCAs. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At 24, I was doing an internship in a place I always thought was a part of the country I never wanted to visit.  Spent a year there, and changed my perspective, now I think I wouldn't mind one bit living in a place like Austin.   But it was eye opening to see how wrong one's preconceived notion about a place can be.  But I remember borrowing a large electronic projector from work over a weekend, and rewatching all of Macross II again from a rental at the blockbuster down the road.  That was fun. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...