Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • 2 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Not exactly a toy but I own the below original painting by Tom Wilson that played Biff Tannen in Back to The Future. Right now its hanging in my man cave that is never visited so basically no one outside my house sees it.

I've seriously thought about selling it but I'm not certain at how much, I paid several hundred dollars for it back in 2014. Any ideas?

http://www.tomwilsonusa.com/images/ju7r58e10htkl1k3fy2f1n7wsv0l94

 

IMG_2269.jpg?format=1000w

Edited by TangledThorns
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a lifelong action figure collector, I've followed the market pretty closely ever since Kenner started producing Star Wars figures in the late '70s.  By the mid-eighties, the market was so big that even properties like M*A*S*H and The Love Boat had action figures!  When toy companies ran out of movies or TV series to adapt, they started developing their own unique TV shows, comics and cartoons, simply to promote their new toy lines.

Now, I understand why it took twenty years before horror icons like Jason, Freddy or Michael Myers became action figures, because that kind of collector's market didn't exist in the '80s, and it would've seemed inappropriate for violent R-rated films to spawn toys (despite vintage RoboCop and Rambo action figures).

But allow me to pose this question to my fellow figure collectors:

            Why the hell did it take 35 YEARS for a family-friendly franchise like Back to the Future to generate an action figure line? :huh:

The hugely successful trilogy spawned comics and a TV cartoon spin-off, and yet there was nothing but a few lousy DeLoreans and a small line of Happy Meal toys back in the day.  Raiders of the Lost Ark, E.T. and Jurassic Park had action figure lines, so we know neither Spielberg nor Universal would have objected... and as Kenner's vintage Terminator and Aliens toylines demonstrate, toy companies were not restricted by likeness rights back then, either.  I just can't imagine why we didn't get a proper line of Back to the Future toys when it would've seemed like a no-brainer at the time.

Any insights?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...