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Candy paints, any experience?


NZEOD
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The base layer is really important, AFAIK. Any defaults in that layer will show through the translucent top layer. It's possible to get a variety of finishes by using different base layer colors, e.g. using a base layer with an obvious metallic grit will give a finishing that's less smooth looking than the examples above.

And before you get caught out by it, Tamiya makes a bunch of pearl sprays, but unlike other manufacturers' pearl paints those are opaque (except obviously the Pearl Clear).

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45 minutes ago, Xigfrid said:

Great question, Salamander would you recommend the PS version (for translucent poly-carbonate) over the TS (for plastic) ? A few PS color are very unique.

Just in case there's some confusion here: With pearl sprays I meant (for example) TS-58 Pearl Light Blue. I had hoped to be able to use it for some subtle effects on a bazooka barrel (for one of those "impossible" Kotobukiya Evangelion resin kits^_^), but had to use way less than expected to get the desired effect.

The Tamiya PS sprays for polycarbonate R/C bodies are meant to be used on the inside of polycarbonate bodies, so the shiny plastic is visible on the outside. When sprayed on the outside of an object they give a satin (semi-gloss) finish. What's nice about them is that they create a flexible layer of paint, so they can also be used on flexible parts. However, I've found they do not create an impermeable layer of paint on e.g. rubber parts, so plasticizers can leech through the paint over time. They also are sensitive to solvents in any paint you add over them, and may dissolve again and mix with the paint covering them:mellow:. The best polycarbonate paint I've ever used are the old spray cans by US manufacturer Parma, who have loads of interesting colors including very rich candies. That one etches into the plastic and is almost indestructible (but reacts with Humbrol oil paints).

Short version: Try on some scrap plastic before putting it on the model.

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Going the Mr Colour Gloss Black - Alclad Hi Shine Chrome and Polished Brass route - Alclad Transparent Red 3:1 Transparent Blue - Alclad Klear Gloss route after practicing on the outside of some paint bottles and plastic spoons.

Hardest part will be having the patience to what a few days between each coat.

Then trying to mask the flames in the Polished Brass layer (after that layer is clear sealed) before the chrome - candy tint layers over the rest of the airframe.

Some fun discoveries so far:

Alclad Hi Shine is actually a transparent metallic so the trick is to spray JUST enough to cover the item to allow the base black gloss to reflect through. Too much metallic layer and it goes dull.

Transparents need to be sprayed in "dust" coats and built up over 3 or 4 applications to avoid pooling in the panel lines and edges.

Model Master Gloss Clear and Future not only dull the finish but actually darken the base finish!

Never mask over the unsealed Hi Shine layer. Ever. Seal it in Alclad Klear first. Hitting it with even low tac Oracal Oramask 810 masking causes the Hi Shine to turn more like basic granulated metallics and not mirrored.

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1 hour ago, arbit said:

This guy has a step by step on his candy VF-25S, which I always thought looks yummy.

http://www.graemenattress.com/wp/vf-25f-172-armored-messiah-alto-custom-2/

 

Looking through his site I can find the finished model but not a step by step. It looks more like a Metallic finish than a candy.

 

Ignore that.... hes the same guy that built the Gunpla I links in the first post. He has a how to in his Paints choice tutorial and shows what he used there. Clears and Pearls over chrome.

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I can do candy colors in small areas well with the alclaid chrome method, but larger areas are far more difficult and I need a lot more practice and hopefully be able to have something great to show off.

the project I really want to do is the new hg Hyakushiki in a yellow candy color. I always have an issue with color clear coats over the chrome being even. I really want to be able to do a candy yellow rather than gold because in the anime the color is never dark or brownish like gold paints and always appears more yellow.

 

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i'm trying to do a Candy SV-51 Nora. Ive got the Decals for the flames traced into a vector for cutting a mask on the sign cutter, just need to get the candy technique right now

 

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lessons learnt today... Alclad chrome looks great but once alclad red goes over it things aren't so bright...

Where as Model Master silver actually made for a good base for the Alclad red!

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13 hours ago, NZEOD said:

i'm trying to do a Candy SV-51 Nora. Ive got the Decals for the flames traced into a vector for cutting a mask on the sign cutter, just need to get the candy technique right now

 

This would be unreal and something I'd absolutely love to see!

And actually, I'd be very interested in getting hold of any masks you do. Having yellow on the decals instead of the gold they should be, has always bothered me. If I could paint them instead of using said decals, it'd look so much better!

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Some, mostly clear pearlescent colours. Trick with Acrylics nee in this case Acrylic Lacquers (all of the Mr Color and Tamiya Enamels are actually lacquer based but lets not get into this argument just yet). If you going to use these brands in both cases brush or airbrush applied you need to us Mr Color 400 Leveler. Nothing else will do. Not Mr Color 400 thinner but LEVELER!!! Cant stress that enough. Even in Tamiya colours. For Humbrol use their thinner although any good (by that I dont mean from Bunnings or Tescos or Macy's) but from a good hardware store that sells quality enamel paints if you want to buy the stuff in bulk otherwise the 50 or 120ml bottles will be plenty. Make sure your base is black. Strangely this is opposite of what you would think but like spraying the Alclad paints you need a really dark base to help reflectivity. 

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If you feel adventurous and have a kit with a lot of fine panel lines (or other detail), you can try putting down a fairly wet (but not dripping) coat of your clear color (well thinned, leveling agent not required IMHO, but depending on the paint you may want to add some retarder). The paint will pool in the panel lines, drying up darker there than on the surfaces, resulting in parts with translucent panel lines a shade darker than the main candy color.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Attempt 1... SV-51.... fail and slight rage disassembly of the item in question...

Attempt 2...SV262... looks passable and am up to the decaling stage now.

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5 hours ago, arbit said:

Not candy coated, but this guy goes to some extreme lengths to gt an amazingly deep finish on his cars.  One day I will try it.

http://www.modelcarsmag.com/perfect-paint/

08.JPG

His techniques wont work for us as we still need to be able to decal the surface which wont go so well with waxing...

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