Jump to content

Countdown until the Shogakukun Macross Package Art Collection Book is released! 
image.png.ceb942b112c95453f3925263e118f68b.png

The countdown has finished!

Beginner's Model Building Construction BASICS


MechTech
 Share

Recommended Posts

bought this at mandarake

http://ekizo.mandarake.co.jp/shop/en/item_s-2035231.html

a 1/144 fighter mode VF-5000g

i think it is a resin model, and this will be my first experiment towards resin parts

1. Will normal lukewarm and liquid soft solution be enough to clean it?

2. Will normal primer work? like Tamiya Surfacer/Primer

3. Do I have to use special type of glue?

4. Anyone can share a completed build to take inspiration from?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the look of that in Jet mode.

I've never built a resin model before, but I found this: https://youtu.be/YltXrBg2GKY

He mentions using soapy water to clean it off. Since discovering automotive degreaser, I found that there are people who use it specifically to clean their plastic and resin models. But I'm sure a good degreasing dishwater liquid soap is all you need. I've never had a problem with oils and grease on model parts ruining a paint job, however, I do believe it's important to get a brand that is specifically good at cutting grease.

Apparently, superglue is only enough to hold parts together until you use polyurethane resin for the adhesive: https://youtu.be/rF2SsWSNt5E

OH - by the way - has anybody used rare earth magnets on their Macross models? I got some teenie ones and they're amazing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

bought this at mandarake

http://ekizo.mandarake.co.jp/shop/en/item_s-2035231.html

a 1/144 fighter mode VF-5000g

i think it is a resin model, and this will be my first experiment towards resin parts

1. Will normal lukewarm and liquid soft solution be enough to clean it?

2. Will normal primer work? like Tamiya Surfacer/Primer

3. Do I have to use special type of glue?

4. Anyone can share a completed build to take inspiration from?

1: probably better to use a stiffer brush and some laundry detergent... that gets most of the mold release agent off.

2: yes, absolutely. This is a Venom FB.5 I built probably 8 years ago with tamiya primer on top. Still looks good today.

2Aaa1.jpg

3) I use Cyanoacrylate (crazy glue) for everything. I have 10 year old kits that look fine today (like the one above).

4) Jefumon may be building the same kit as we speak in the workbench thread. However I never seen the VF-5000 built. If you want some inspiration, search the forums for VF-4 in 1/72, and you'll come across a lot of very high quality resin works.

Hope that helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies guys!

@galaxy_stranger

I have no problem with paint and grease on my model as well but that is because they are plastic models. From what I heard/read, resin has some serious Mold Release that needs to be removed. Of coure, a lacquer based primer will help since the hotness can pierce through the grease

@noyhauser

thanks as well, good to know that Tamiya primer works. I actually got a spare Tamiya PINK lying around, this makes it easier for me since I dont need to buy extra tools

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies guys!

@galaxy_stranger

I have no problem with paint and grease on my model as well but that is because they are plastic models. From what I heard/read, resin has some serious Mold Release that needs to be removed. Of coure, a lacquer based primer will help since the hotness can pierce through the grease

@noyhauser

thanks as well, good to know that Tamiya primer works. I actually got a spare Tamiya PINK lying around, this makes it easier for me since I dont need to buy extra tools

Thanks for the replies guys!

@galaxy_stranger

I have no problem with paint and grease on my model as well but that is because they are plastic models. From what I heard/read, resin has some serious Mold Release that needs to be removed. Of coure, a lacquer based primer will help since the hotness can pierce through the grease

@noyhauser

thanks as well, good to know that Tamiya primer works. I actually got a spare Tamiya PINK lying around, this makes it easier for me since I dont need to buy extra tools

I've probably built 10+ resin kits over the years, mostly WWII or Cold War fighters, with a couple of Macross kits thrown in. Very few have any mold release problems. Actually only one had any problems. Then again, most of mine were Czech, not Japanese, and they tend to have higher production runs I've probably had to clean less than a 1/3rd of them... though its a good general rule to. Or not. Its really never bit me in the ass before.

Here's a couple I've built over the years.

8J10_zps0b48f67e.jpg

1U7.jpg

6F5.jpg

4B32.jpg

3I5.jpg

3I2.jpg

2c17.jpg

DSC_0314-3.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4) Jefumon may be building the same kit as we speak in the workbench thread. However I never seen the VF-5000 built. If you want some inspiration, search the forums for VF-4 in 1/72, and you'll come across a lot of very high quality resin works.

Same company, same scale, but not that kit!

I thoroughly scrubbed the kits with a toothbrush and dish detergent in warm water, then rinse and let air dry. You need a superglue type, regular model glue won't do anything. And you have to prime, or no paint will stick to it. I used to use a dedicated resin primer, until I found out that Mr. Surfacer 1000 works a lot better.

Also, be careful of resin dust when you're sanding the parts. Wearing a mask is recommended.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great work

How do you approach canopies?

Ah, those aren't my better works in this area (most of those kits, except the 1st one are over 5 years old). However vacuform canopies are always a bear to do. I tend to do do an initial scoreline, then follow up with the exactoknife, deepening the score until it I break through. Then I sand the bottom flat (if required) by a file or a fastened sandpaper piece.

Then is the tedious job of mounting; this takes a lot of time to fit it, cut down excess areas, and test it again. Often its not going to be 100% as you'll affect the proper shape too much.

8T8_zps5e13c5a5.jpg

Next I dip it in future: its critical for three reasons. #1 it gives the canopy a glossy look that is more realistic. #2 its a somewhat weak primer, which helps the paint adhere to the smooth surface. #3: it protects the plastic from damage, particularly if you decide to use CA to glue parts of it.

After this step is masking... which can be the longest part of this effort... like with WWII japanese aircraft.

IMG_0352_zps335f7f9a.jpg

Afterwards I affix the canopy to the aircraft, usually using a white glue type item (gatorglue) that fills in any gaps, with a very little bit of CA on some of the better bonded areas. That's often unnecessary though, as gate glue does a good job of keeping in place. Afterwards, I usually paint the interior frame colour first... like with black for this B5N, as the interior is black.

IMG_0362_zps50a9a832.jpg

Finally I hit it with the main colour, but I do not do a gloss coat over the canopy area: future tends to run and create some bad isutations. Rather I only put the final top coat (like a satin or flat) and call it a day unless there is weathering to be done. The B5Ns During Pearl Harbour were relatively new, so I didn't do that much. Excuse the dustiness, I think there is some stuff on the camera lens that's making it look a lot less clean than it actually is.

9f6_zpse47a4114.jpg

Edited by Noyhauser
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, it's as tedious as I thought it was....

This guy has a couple techniques I find interesting. I don't have a machine shop to make my own custom tools, but this guy has some interesting ideas. Of course, he's a freaking Dentist and inherently has access to certain things...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHJmxKKxsew

I'm also going to be playing around with some latex masking products and see how that works.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what I am doing now is similar to what the Bare metal method is but with layers of tamiya masking tape and usage of fresh x-acto blades. Though what Paul Budzik does for other method is really great but really requires lots of practice to have similar end-product as he does. What I really like though is what he used for polishing or buffing the canopy, who really needs future if you can buff your canopy to that level :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure, except that future also protects the canopy from damage, which is pretty helpful for vacuform which cannot be glued.

I use a different method I pulled out of Model Graphix a couple of years ago. Basically you cut out small squares which you progressively build up a mask for a square. This is a SB2U Vindicator I built a few years ago.

7Q2_zps4ebc8ab1.jpg

Basically you cut out small squares which you then apply to the area. You slowly do that until you make a complete mask. With a bit of practice you can also do it for curved surfaces, which is really useful.

7Q3_zps658de908.jpg

7T7_zps70b2b9cb.jpg

Now my error with this kit was that applied future as a sealant over top of the aluminum finish... which was a really bad idea because I got bleed through which damaged the crisp edges of the canopy frame mask. Unfortunate, which is why I don't apply it anymore on canopies, regardless of the situation.

Edited by Noyhauser
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like this?

9P1_zpskm3ncplz.jpg

It works pretty well. Its best used for large areas, particularly where the frame might have a curve to it, as the thin strips of tape can be made to match the contours. Just note that if you're using the Gunze stuff, that it will react with a future layer if it is not completely cured. That's never happened to me personally, but I've heard others complain about reactions happening.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Just a word of warning with uncured latex: when wet, it may strip acrylic paint & Future polish. Please test first. It's probably safe for acrylics when dry.

I tried doing a latex mold over sculpey (with Castin' Craft Mold Builder that has ammonia in it, I think) and it ate the Future and some of the acrylic paint.

On the other hand, enamels and lacquers may eat the latex. Again, please test. Good luck! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a word of warning with uncured latex: when wet, it may strip acrylic paint & Future polish. Please test first. It's probably safe for acrylics when dry.

I tried doing a latex mold over sculpey (with Castin' Craft Mold Builder that has ammonia in it, I think) and it ate the Future and some of the acrylic paint.

On the other hand, enamels and lacquers may eat the latex. Again, please test. Good luck! :)

beat you to it. :p

As you say, its all about the curing time. Gunze in general cures slowly, nearly as long as some enamels. You;ll see it crack future if the latter is applied too early (within a 24 hours in some cases).

Edited by Noyhauser
Link to comment
Share on other sites

DSC_9447_zpsxycrzxb2.jpg

First time handling resin, what is the safest way to remove it from the block/sprue? And apparently, that very thin plastic is the canopy. The upper part portion is fortunately, is not warped, so this means I just need to cut it using scissors?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, you're really going to need to invest in some items.

The most basic is a razor saw. I personally like the JLC version, which they sell here. They give a really flat, consistent cut, and are the most basic of tools. A lot of people also use handheld dremel tools to cut, sand and the like. I think they are very good, I just find its initially more convenient and more rewarding for me to use non powered tools.

As for vacuform canopies, see my reply on post #329.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would be EXTREMELY interested in the results of Mr. Setter and Softer. I've been using Microsol and Microset for 25 years. I don't really have any complaints with the micro products, but I'm interested in alternatives that give an even BETTER result!

I love them. Guess the best testimony I could give for Mr's Softer and Setter is my Nora SV-51 kit.

post-12411-0-97461600-1399941520_thumb.jpg
post-12411-0-66201800-1399941500_thumb.jpg
post-12411-0-88964200-1399941462_thumb.jpg
Had no troubles at all with the decalling on that kit.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...