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Earthquake in japan


Murphy
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Anyhow, we've switched from incandescent light bulbs to neon light bulbs, and I encourage other MW members, both within and outside Japan to do the same. Not only do they last longer, but they consume considerably less electricity so that in the long-term, they are more than worth the slightly more expensive initial cost in reduced electric bills.

This is something that the E.U is pushing, to that end 100w bulbs are no longer commercially available in shops for domestic use, once stock is gone its gone.

The newer generation Neon/LED/CFL/Halogen lamps are in most cases superior to their incandescent equivalents both in Lumen's output and energy usage.

Solar energy is the key though, my mothers neighbours have it installed on the two houses in her road that they own, one is empty at the mo and produces the same amount of electricity that the one they live in uses add the two together, and minus used power, the net sell back to the power company means its practically free to them, disregarding the cost of the solar install of cause.

On the subject of Quakes there was a scientist on one of the news programs on the BBC (UK) the other night who has mapped the stress points under Japan and showed the points where the most stress was being experienced currently, the before and after pictures were shown. The most stressed areas were directly south of the Sendai area and around Tokyo, he almost went as far to say that more tectonic activity was certain for the Tokyo area. :(

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Anyhow, we've switched from incandescent light bulbs to neon light bulbs, and I encourage other MW members, both within and outside Japan to do the same. Not only do they last longer, but they consume considerably less electricity so that in the long-term, they are more than worth the slightly more expensive initial cost in reduced electric bills.

In Argentina, the government has recently passed a law prohibiting and discontinuing incandescent light bulbs. Like big F said, once they're gone, they're gone for good. We are slowly changing to LED/neon/CFL. I've changed all the lights in my house and I'm paying less than half for electricity.

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Back to the topic

Headlines at Japan Times:

Plutonium traces point to core leak (Heavy fuel rod damage feared; trenches fill up with toxic water): http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20110330a1.html

(I'm a bit confused by it's wording - is some of the detected plutonium leftovers from the old atmospheric nuclear warhead tests? Or is it simply "like" the immediate aftermath of those tests?)

Tepco comes under fire for issuing erroneous info: http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20110330a3.html

Utilities' monopoly on power backfires: http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20110330a4.html

(Japan has enough power - but why isn't it getting to Tokyo? Historical reasons, my eye. Monopolistic 'tards.)

Nationalization of Tepco seen as possibility: http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20110330a6.html

(I don't want my taxes used to help prop up the monopolistic 'tards. But is the alternative better? Will there be less government money wastage if Tepco is privatized?)

Working conditions 'must improve': http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20110330a8.html

(I feel really bad for the workers. They're giving there all, yet there living conditions are just heartbreaking. I'm all for nationalization if it'll improve both the living conditions and radiation protection of the workers. Damn monopolistic 'tards. >.< )

EDIT: note all questions are rhetorical

Edited by sketchley
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Anyhow, we've switched from incandescent light bulbs to neon light bulbs, and I encourage other MW members, both within and outside Japan to do the same. Not only do they last longer, but they consume considerably less electricity so that in the long-term, they are more than worth the slightly more expensive initial cost in reduced electric bills.

While I'm aware that neon light bulbs aka energy-saving bulbs are more economical and environmentally friendly, they can also be a toy collector's nightmare. These bulbs emit UV rays, which can potentially yellow any white plastic. You definitely do NOT want to place your VF-1J or -1S anywhere near these bulbs when they're switched on.

I'd opt for LED bulbs, but they're simply not available at my country [yet.]

The so-called "domed" CLF bulb [don't remember the proper name], in which a glass globe is installed over the neon tube, is said reduce UV emission--but is it enough to be safe around plastic? Who knows?

That said, I plan to fully use LED lighting in my house as soon as these become available locally. Hopefully soon.

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Back to the topic

Headlines at Japan Times:

Plutonium traces point to core leak (Heavy fuel rod damage feared; trenches fill up with toxic water): http://search.japant...20110330a1.html

(I'm a bit confused by it's wording - is some of the detected plutonium leftovers from the old atmospheric nuclear warhead tests? Or is it simply "like" the immediate aftermath of those tests?)

Tepco comes under fire for issuing erroneous info: http://search.japant...20110330a3.html

Utilities' monopoly on power backfires: http://search.japant...20110330a4.html

(Japan has enough power - but why isn't it getting to Tokyo? Historical reasons, my eye. Monopolistic 'tards.)

Nationalization of Tepco seen as possibility: http://search.japant...20110330a6.html

(I don't want my taxes used to help prop up the monopolistic 'tards. But is the alternative better? Will there be less government money wastage if Tepco is privatized?)

Working conditions 'must improve': http://search.japant...20110330a8.html

(I feel really bad for the workers. They're giving there all, yet there living conditions are just heartbreaking. I'm all for nationalization if it'll improve both the living conditions and radiation protection of the workers. Damn monopolistic 'tards. >.< )

EDIT: note all questions are rhetorical

Not sure about Plutonium traces but Japan would be the most likely country to have an OTT trace count of the stuff due to the WWII use of mass people subjugation used at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, that said I'm not sure of the life of Plutonium, but I do recall being told that all Nuclear based "created elements have signatures which can be used to trace where they were made.

On the subject of Nationalised services, it didn't work to well in the U.K, we now have a telco who wants to own the world, power companies who are more interested in share holder profit, and schools run like elite academies, that's without the NHS which is busy flushing it's self down the drain.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Another big quake hit about and hour or so ago. Save and his friends and I were sitting in a bar, and managed to stave it off by singing the chorus of "Dynamite Explosion" very loudly.

This is getting really damn annoying.

7.4 Quake

:( Hang in there Japan!!!!

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Not sure about Plutonium traces but Japan would be the most likely country to have an OTT trace count of the stuff due to the WWII use of mass people subjugation used at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, that said I'm not sure of the life of Plutonium, but I do recall being told that all Nuclear based "created elements have signatures which can be used to trace where they were made.

In order of increasing threat to human health (might have the specific isotopes wrong), in my opinion:

1) Iodine-131: 1/2life of 8 days.

2) Caesium-137: 1/2life of 30 years.

3) Plutonium-239: 1/2life of 24,000 years.

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I'm beginning to wonder when these quakes are going to end... :(

-Kyp

Probably not for a quite a few hundred million years until the outer core cools down enough to lock geological movement. But in the short term who knows when this current spate of jolts will end. :(

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Probably not for a quite a few hundred million years until the outer core cools down enough to lock geological movement.

Oh, cool, around the time the live-action Robotech movie comes out, then? :p

(SORRY, SORRY!! I couldn't help myself.)

Anyway, to show a lighter side of all of this and get away briefly from the doom and gloom, here are some pics of my fallen comrades.

The Genesis of Aquarion? More like "Revelation"...

post-1318-0-44380700-1302360487_thumb.jpg

If this shelf looks mostly empty, there's a reason. Note the two FAST pack missile things. Also, that bent nosecone is pretty funny.

post-1318-0-93904700-1302360494_thumb.jpg

...Ah, there's the rest of my 1/48 Millia. Took one hell of a dive.post-1318-0-44723000-1302360491_thumb.jpg

"Koenig" Monster... de-throned. Note also the books piled atop it.post-1318-0-70550100-1302360498_thumb.jpg

These guys look like they're just chillin'.post-1318-0-51907700-1302360502_thumb.jpgpost-1318-0-01402400-1302360506_thumb.jpg

But nothing was damaged! Or so I thought. I later took a look at my Proto-Garland and it had snapped in half. But that toy hated me from the very second I took it out of the box, hell, so many pieces broke off it even before the earthquake that I think it just used the quake as an excuse to disintegrate. :p

Kudos to the Yamato stands, too. They shifted position a fair bit and almost slid off the shelves, but they never gave. As I said in another thread: great investment. B))

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In order of increasing threat to human health (might have the specific isotopes wrong), in my opinion:

1) Iodine-131: 1/2life of 8 days.

2) Caesium-137: 1/2life of 30 years.

3) Plutonium-239: 1/2life of 24,000 years.

The cesium is far more hazardous than the iodine. Iodine 131 is commonly used in medicine since it decays so fast and can be used to target the thyroid. You can prevent iodine absorption by keeping yourself topped off on iodine-127.

edit:I may have misunderstood your rankings. I saw 1-3 but I noticed you put 'in order of increasing risk.' If I am reading that right then we agree.

While I'm aware that neon light bulbs aka energy-saving bulbs are more economical and environmentally friendly, they can also be a toy collector's nightmare. These bulbs emit UV rays, which can potentially yellow any white plastic. You definitely do NOT want to place your VF-1J or -1S anywhere near these bulbs when they're switched on.

The UV radiation emitted from a CFL is tiny. The amount of UV exposure you receive from 8 hours in a office brightly lit with cfl's is equal to 1 minute of sunlight in the Washington DC area. Your toys should be fine, save a planet in the mean time.

Edited by ATLMYK
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[...]

But nothing was damaged! [...]

Kudos to the Yamato stands, too. They shifted position a fair bit and almost slid off the shelves, but they never gave. As I said in another thread: great investment. B))

Japanese are awesome: even their toys are anti-seismic :p

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"Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant has been upgraded from 5 to 7 on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale."

I guess things have gotten worse than I had hoped :(

*Edit* From what I can gather it was upgraded due to the length of the accident.

Edited by Loop
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"Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant has been upgraded from 5 to 7 on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale."

I guess things have gotten worse than I had hoped :(

*Edit* From what I can gather it was upgraded due to the length of the accident.

Things haven't gotten worse, it's always been a lvl 6-7 accident but now they're finally owning up to how bad it's been. Remember, the French Nuclear body was calling this a level 6 accident within the first few days, even though Tokyo Electric (and some vocal types on this board) was insisting that it wasn't that bad.

And while it has the same rating as Chrenobyl, the total amount of radioactive materials that have been released is thought to be only around 10% of what Chernobyl spewed into the environment.

So don't worry, things aren't worse... they're just finally owning up to how bad it's always been.

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Things haven't gotten worse, it's always been a lvl 6-7 accident but now they're finally owning up to how bad it's been. Remember, the French Nuclear body was calling this a level 6 accident within the first few days, even though Tokyo Electric (and some vocal types on this board) was insisting that it wasn't that bad.

And while it has the same rating as Chrenobyl, the total amount of radioactive materials that have been released is thought to be only around 10% of what Chernobyl spewed into the environment.

So don't worry, things aren't worse... they're just finally owning up to how bad it's always been.

I totally realize that it is not as bad as Chernobyl ever was, I was just stating that the IAEA has elevated the rating from 5 to 7. It was based on length of the accident and not total nuclear material leaked. And when I say "worse" I was referencing the fire that broke out in reactor 4 when crews had to evacuate.

Level 7

"An event resulting in an environmental release corresponding to a quantity of radioactivity radiologically equivalent to a release to the atmosphere of more than several tens of thousands of terabequerels of I-131."

NISA estimates that the release of radioactive material to the atmosphere is approximately 10% of the Chernobyl accident, which is the only other accident to have an INES Level 7 rating.

So as of now they say it's about %10 of the total release from Chernobyl.

Source: http://www.iaea.org/...miupdate01.html

Also the Evacuation area has grown now to 20KM and residents have about a month or so to move.

Edited by Loop
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I totally realize that it is not as bad as Chernobyl ever was, I was just stating that the IAEA has elevated the rating from 5 to 7. It was based on length of the accident and not total nuclear material leaked. And when I say "worse" I was referencing the fire that broke out in reactor 4 when crews had to evacuate.

No, that's just wrong. The level 7 accident rating was due to the amount of materials released and the area that was affected, not the duration. Remember, international experts were calling the fukushima meltdown a class 6 accident within the first week. It was Tokyo Electric, that was insisting that it was only a class 4 "event" and only after reports of partial meltdowns in the spent fuel tanks that they even admitted to the level 5 "accident" rating.

There's been several fires at the reactor in the past month, the most recent fire (after the aftershock on monday) was in a battery room and was put out almost immediately, released no radioactive materials and did not further endanger the plant. It had no effect on the L7 rating.

But again, the key part of the story is that the total amount of radioactive materials released (so far) is roughly 10% of what was released at Chernobyl and the total amount of cesium is around 7%.

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No, that's just wrong. The level 7 accident rating was due to the amount of materials released and the area that was affected.

"This new provisional rating considers the accidents that occurred at Units 1, 2 and 3 as a single event on INES and uses estimated total release to the atmosphere as a justification. Previously, separate provisional INES Level 5 ratings had been applied for Units 1, 2 and 3."

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