Jump to content

Recommended Posts

can any one recommend a anonymous web browser Google play has a few on the android store for my tablet which is what i use for most of my web browsing, and the reviews are favorable.

I am tired of having Google vomiting the contents of the internet when I search for something.

When I was in college all my professor's where adamant that Wikipedia was not a acceptable source for papers and I developed a habit of dismissing Wiki as a internet source period.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can only industry people attend CES or can the general public also attend?

Anyone can attend, but passes are like Comicon or E3. They sell like hotcakes and you're lucky if you get one. Folks in the industry have an easier time getting them cuz they go as exhibitors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Keep in mind a Full Access-pass is $1300. So it's really geared toward people of industry (i.e., get work to pay for it), but it is open to everyone.

Wow! Well, that explains why most people don't go. I think some people would be willing to throw down $200-300 to attend something like that, but $1300's another story.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

HoloLens is a neat idea, but so did Oculus Rift, and we're still waiting on a consumer version of that. So while I think it's interesting, I'm not ready to get excited about it yet.

Windows 10, though... I haven't been this excited for a Windows OS since 7. I'd already been using the developer preview on a spare desktop and was digging what I saw, but the way they're making it intelligently know if you're using it with a touchscreen or a mouse and keyboard, the ability to scale to different sizes, that's pretty cool. And the Xbox One streaming is cake. I freely admit that I'll be using it to play Forza Horizon on the can.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what do you guts think of this Microsoft "HoloLens" tech?

i'm curious...

Freaky... if it actually works as advertised.

On the gaming front I think visual headsets will be what audio headphones currently are. Just like 7.1 headphones replacing speakers, wires and a subwoofer a visual headset can do the same, I hope, by replacing a large monitor on your desk.

My only concern is that these headset don't cause headaches or vision problems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My only worry is the confusion about this statement: "“Windows 10 is a service”.

When it say something like that, it makes people do a double-take. And it makes me worry that Windows 11 is hiding around the corner, making Windows 10 literally a "service".

But otherwise, it's nice to see Microsoft learned from their mistake named "Windows 8". Adoption rate will still be low as companies are just moving off XP to 7.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My only worry is the confusion about this statement: "“Windows 10 is a service”.

When it say something like that, it makes people do a double-take. And it makes me worry that Windows 11 is hiding around the corner, making Windows 10 literally a "service".

But otherwise, it's nice to see Microsoft learned from their mistake named "Windows 8". Adoption rate will still be low as companies are just moving off XP to 7.

Like Office 365?

Well, they said it when they were talking about the free upgrade. Well, we're used to free OS updates on our phones, and with Mavericks Apple's doing it with iOS. Microsoft said they want to end the question of "what version of Windows are you using?" The current thinking is that Microsoft is following suit, and that once you have Windows 10 you'll have updates in perpetuity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

HoloLens: It makes sense that Microsoft is targeting a broad market with this gadget. Whereas Google Glass tripped in its introduction by throwing the technology out into the wild without any explanation (creating a cultural aftershock) and the Oculus Rift is more of a dedicated gaming device.

Microsoft proposes some interesting ideas in its demo, but I think a lot of those ideas are pie-in-the-sky or simply trying to leverage the popularity of VR gadgets. What I find more interesting is how Microsoft is taking more risks with new hardware.

Windows 10: I like that it will be a free upgrade for both Windows 7 and 8.1 users. I'll be trying it out since I skipped Windows 8 and want to take a tour of the new interface. I'm not too worried about the use of the word service. Since ending support for XP, I think Windows has steadily been turning to a pure service model. That is, the company releases newer versions of the software more frequently with shorter support cycles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The current thinking is that Microsoft is following suit, and that once you have Windows 10 you'll have updates in perpetuity.

Unfortunately, it doesn't explain what will happen if I have to rebuild my system. Or for system builders. Free upgrades for anyone using 7/8/8.1 for 1 year. After that 1 year, what then? If I do a system hardware refresh, do I still qualify for a free upgrade?

A few more things:

Universal apps is something Microsoft has been trying to push for, especially when they tried to start it with Win 8. We know how that ended up. As someone pointed out, creating a quick clip and posting it on Youtube is one thing, cutting together a Hollywood movie is another. And they want apps to work across mobile and desktop platforms?

The "Spartan" browser. A lot of companies that built their work around IE are probably going to recommend not switching to Win 10. Not to mention all the work that has been put into IE and its related components is going down the drain. I would say this is something they should have started sooner.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, it doesn't explain what will happen if I have to rebuild my system. Or for system builders. Free upgrades for anyone using 7/8/8.1 for 1 year. After that 1 year, what then? If I do a system hardware refresh, do I still qualify for a free upgrade?

The first reports were a little muddled on this, but Microsoft has been trying to clarify its point:

http://www.pcgamer.com/microsoft-windows-10-will-not-be-sold-as-a-subscription/

Given this, my understanding basically matches what I wrote above. Anyone who gets Windows 10 during the promotion will have a free upgrade copy. It should work as it does on all prior Windows upgrades and users, like system builders, shouldn't have to worry about buying a new copy just to wipe and reformat a drive.

However, the long-term support that we were used to is changing. We will get fewer service pack upgrades and more incremental updates such as what is pushed out on Patch Tuesday now.

I don't know much about app store integration since I didn't demo Windows 8 and have no experience with that functionality using Microsoft tools. With MacOS, apps and the iTunes app store are fundamental. Given the Xbox streaming stuff, I would qualify this version as an effort for Microsoft to gain ground in the mainstream.

The business benefit is limited, I think. Especially now, given what azrael pointed out above. I don't see too many companies paying the price for another complete OS upgrade straight away after moving to Windows 7. If Windows 10 has the same staying power that 7 has, then this might be something to reconsider in five or seven years.

Right now, this is limited to the pioneers of technology.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the gaming front I think visual headsets will be what audio headphones currently are. Just like 7.1 headphones replacing speakers, wires and a subwoofer a visual headset can do the same, I hope, by replacing a large monitor on your desk.

My only concern is that these headset don't cause headaches or vision problems.

I hope that VR goggles aim to a higher quality standard than 8-channel headphones do...

Headaches, unfortunately, is likely going to continue to be a problem with VR goggles, and any other (realistically deployable) 3D display technology, for the forseeable future.

Our brain really doesn't like it when our eyes look at one distance and see ALL the distances. It's strange and weird and it upsets the natural order. And thus we get headaches and, paradoxically, eye strain.

While the effect can be reduced, the only way to eliminate it completely is to have a display with ACTUAL depth instead of two flat displays(or a neural interface, but... yeah).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

However, the long-term support that we were used to is changing. We will get fewer service pack upgrades and more incremental updates such as what is pushed out on Patch Tuesday now.

...

The business benefit is limited, I think. Especially now, given what azrael pointed out above. I don't see too many companies paying the price for another complete OS upgrade straight away after moving to Windows 7. If Windows 10 has the same staying power that 7 has, then this might be something to reconsider in five or seven years.

Right now, this is limited to the pioneers of technology.

This is what I'm alluding to in my 1st post about the press event. I would feel like Windows 11 is coming out right as I upgrade to 10. It was hard enough to get business to switch to 7. Rapid releasing the OS will make things rather difficult for people to adopt the upgrade.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is what I'm alluding to in my 1st post about the press event. I would feel like Windows 11 is coming out right as I upgrade to 10. It was hard enough to get business to switch to 7. Rapid releasing the OS will make things rather difficult for people to adopt the upgrade.

Microsoft seemed to imply that once you're on 10 updates are free in perpetuity. If Windows 11 came out right after you upgrade, you'd be able to download it as an update. This is what they're getting at when they say they want to eliminate the question of "what version of Windows are you on?" By pushing more frequent updates with smaller overall changes (especially if they can do it through Windows Update), Microsoft is hoping to get everyone on the latest version of Windows and keep them there.

Is this Windows 10 service somthing I a Ordinart PC user have to pay a monthly service fee to use?

No. If you have Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 8.1, you will have one year to upgrade to Windows 10 at no cost. If you wait longer than a year, you will have to pay to upgrade, although no pricing has been announced. Whether you upgraded for free or paid to upgrade, there are no more costs for Windows after you're on 10. In fact, as I mentioned to Az, it seems that Microsoft's plan is that updates beyond 10 will be free for Windows 10 users, so if you upgrade to Windows 10 and Microsoft releases Windows 11 you'll get that for free.

And as incredible as that sounds, just two or so years ago I had to look into Microsoft for a grad school assignment. As ubiquitous as Windows is, it's not a huge money-maker in the first place for Microsoft. Microsoft's real money-maker is Office (hence the subscription service for it now), which accounts for around 55% of Microsoft's revenue. They're not losing a lot if they make Windows free.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest davidwhangchoi

windows 10 for free? when upgrading from 7, 8.1, 8.2,

eh, i'm already at windows 95, i'm going to upgrade to 98 soon. once the 486 processors come out :p

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is this Windows 10 service somthing I a Ordinart PC user have to pay a monthly service fee to use?

Let me clear this up. Windows 10 IS NOT a "service". With Windows 10, Microsoft is trying to do several things. First, they are allowing users of Windows 7 and 8/8.1 to upgrade for free, during the 1st year of Windows 10's release. My argument with this is, it is hard to get people to upgrade Windows, especially in the business world. Microsoft is currently adopting this stance of rapid-releasing of the OS. Windows 8 to 8.1 carried noticeable changes. What happens if Windows 10.1 does the same and carry substantial changes? At the same time, with a rapid release, is Windows 11 coming sooner than expected? What happens after that 1st year when upgrades are no longer free? What about people like system builders? Do they get free upgrades? Keep in mind they are using the word "upgrade". So you would have to have a license for Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 and then upgrade to 10. Microsoft didn't mention pricing during their event. If we want these upgrades for free, we have to upgrade year after year or we end up paying? So it's like a service. Upgrade or pay. But seeing how slow adoption of Windows 7 was and how much of a blunder Windows 8 was, do they expect people to jump onto this bandwagon? They want people to adopt Windows and to do that, they are simplifying things for developers to create universal apps. So 1 app for desktops, Xbox, tablets, and phones. In theory, this is great. In practice, not so much. There are certain things that work well on 1 platform but do not work as well on others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let me clear this up. Windows 10 IS NOT a "service". With Windows 10, Microsoft is trying to do several things. First, they are allowing users of Windows 7 and 8/8.1 to upgrade for free, during the 1st year of Windows 10's release.

Which is an extensio of the Windows 8 upgrade for cheap at launch(I believe it was thirty bucks).

My argument with this is, it is hard to get people to upgrade Windows, especially in the business world. Microsoft is currently adopting this stance of rapid-releasing of the OS. Windows 8 to 8.1 carried noticeable changes. What happens if Windows 10.1 does the same and carry substantial changes?

The exact same thing that happens when you install service pack 1 on 7.

The point releases are service packs. It's just that 8.1 is a prettier and more intuitive name than 7 SP1.

At the same time, with a rapid release, is Windows 11 coming sooner than expected?

The impression I got was not "we are launching Windows versions fast and furious" but rather "when we have a cool new feature ready, it goes up on Windows Update immediately instead of being held back until we have enough cool new features for a service pack to go out"

What happens after that 1st year when upgrades are no longer free?

The same thing as now. You buy a copy of Windows.

If you mean "if I reinstall after that first year" then MS has already made it clear that the free upgrade license is a normal license in all regards. It does not expire. The PROMOTION is good for one year, not the LICENSE.

Keep in mind they are using the word "upgrade". So you would have to have a license for Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 and then upgrade to 10.

Which does not mean you have to INSTALL Windows 7 or 8 first. Upgrade licenses can do a clean install, but they will ask for proof you have the older version before installing.

Microsoft didn't mention pricing during their event. If we want these upgrades for free, we have to upgrade year after year or we end up paying?

I assume it works the same as everything post-98. Service packs are free, major releases cost.

Of course, "major releases cost" hasn't exactly been true lately.

So it's like a service. Upgrade or pay.

In the same way that Windows XP was a service, sure.

But seeing how slow adoption of Windows 7 was and how much of a blunder Windows 8 was, do they expect people to jump onto this bandwagon?

That's why Win10 is coming out so fast, and so different. They burned a lot of bridges with 8. They have a limited amount of time to prove they can still do a traditional PC OS right before people jump ship to Apple or, god forbid, Google.

So 1 app for desktops, Xbox, tablets, and phones. In theory, this is great. In practice, not so much. There are certain things that work well on 1 platform but do not work as well on others.

And MS knows that. A universal app doesn't present and behave identically on all the platforms it runs on.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's why Win10 is coming out so fast, and so different.

Different, sure. But not fast.

When Windows 10 is released, it'll have been about three years since 8. Which was about three years after 7. Which was about 3 years after Vista.

And before XP, Windows 95 was about three years after 3.1, 98 three years after 95, and XP 3 years after 98 (wo to those of you who ended up with ME, though).

Three years between major revisions isn't fast; it's been Microsoft's target for at least 20 years. That huge gap between XP and Vista that everyone remembers wasn't normal, it was an anomaly. Worse for Microsoft, it was an anomaly that that had everyone clinging to it for so long it took them over a decade to finally kill support for it and had people questioning the need for major OS updates every 3 years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Different, sure. But not fast.

When Windows 10 is released, it'll have been about three years since 8. Which was about three years after 7. Which was about 3 years after Vista.

And before XP, Windows 95 was about three years after 3.1, 98 three years after 95, and XP 3 years after 98 (wo to those of you who ended up with ME, though).

Three years between major revisions isn't fast; it's been Microsoft's target for at least 20 years. That huge gap between XP and Vista that everyone remembers wasn't normal, it was an anomaly. Worse for Microsoft, it was an anomaly that that had everyone clinging to it for so long it took them over a decade to finally kill support for it and had people questioning the need for major OS updates every 3 years.

Huh. It feels shorter than that.

Probably some combination of XP lasting so long and everyone getting hyped about Win10 well in advance of release.

The saddest part about ME is... if compatibility layers had been ready at launch, Windows 2000 would've been the first NT targetted at home users.

If nothing else, MS learned a valuable lesson about being backwards-compatible with old drivers. ME introduced a new driver standard. While ME could USE them, they were were far from optimal.

Much of ME's legendary stability problems were down to companies offering 98 drivers and claiming they were ME drivers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Few people like a "big 'ol desktop" PC more than me, but I'm thinking it's time for a laptop. (have tablet, but I find myself needing a mouse+keyboard SO often to do what I want).

But I really don't know who makes good laptops, or even what the standard/good specs for them are. My requirements/usage:

"Portable replacement for desktop PC" for use on kitchen table and in bedroom---not going to be hauled around everywhere, not going to be used for gaming much if at all. For working on files, photoshopping etc. Will of course be used for media/browsing.

Biggest thing that slows down my current PC-----folders with zillions of files inside. It's just how I have things arranged, and I know where everything is. But both the OS itself, and any program where it has to open up a folder to find/open/save a file---when it finds one of those "5,000+ files" folders, it often slows to a crawl for a second or two (or ten). I think the main problem is that they want to tend to READ all those files, and get the date/size/thumbnail etc for all of them, when all it SHOULD be doing is looking at the raw name and displaying nothing else. But anyways----yeah, whatever spec/aspect would help speed that up, is the #1 thing I'd be looking for. Faster CPU? More cores? More RAM? Faster RAM? Faster HDD? (SDD?). What would speed up "opening up folders that have zillions of files inside". Large PDF's (especially multi-layered ones) also tend to be have performance issues---not sure if that's Adobe's fault, or what.

I am of course, very picky when it comes to the monitor (color gradiants!) so having a high-quality screen is of course of paramount importance. Tiny keyboard buttons also irritating. I do not have giant hands as guys go, but I swear some keyboards have "12-year-old-girl" as a finger-size-limit. Like "deep" button-presses. Too many have like 0.25mm between "depressed and not".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Few people like a "big 'ol desktop" PC more than me, but I'm thinking it's time for a laptop. (have tablet, but I find myself needing a mouse+keyboard SO often to do what I want).

How much time do you plan to spend on it? More time, then I would look at a 15" screen. Moderate time? 13"-14" screen. If you're photoshopping a lot, you'll benefit from the real estate at 15".

Do you plan on traveling with it? Larger laptops may feel light just carrying around the house, but when you have that thing in a bag or backpack, carrying around for an hour, it starts to weigh you down. Plus have fun yanking it out and putting it back in every time you pass through the security checkpoint.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"not going to be hauled around everywhere" means it'll likely never leave the house.

It'll likely spend most of its time propped up on my bed, not on a desk or table.

So then screen size? There are options for high-res displays if you want.

An SSD will likely speed things up but the $/GB still isn't as good as a HDD. So do you want storage space or do you want speed? That would probably resolve your large folder issue that you hate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's not the total size of the files, it's their sheer quantity I think. ::checks:: Worst offender has 12,600 files in a single folder. (and there's not much more sorting I could/would want to do beyond that---making a half-dozen new sub-folders to put 30% of them somewhere else is more hassle than its worth)

My Laptop wouldn't need to keep all my video files stored within, as I'd likely just "transfer what I need" from my main PC if I wanted to watch something.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When it comes to gaming, I've never been satisfied with any laptop I've owned, including two that were specifically designed for gaming.

When it comes to non-gaming tasks, I haven't been picky enough to care.

I will say I've been using a Surface Pro 3, and I've been generally digging it. Are you still planning on keeping your desktop? I have a 3TB storage drive in my desktop, and I set that entire drive to be shared, so as long as the desktop is on (and it almost always is) the Surface can get at them.

As for speeding up your desktop, it could be a little of just about all the reasons you suggested. What specs does it have?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I plan to keep my desktop and use it primarily. But upgrading the CPU would require a new motherboard, so not until "the next breakthrough" or something. Current specs:

CPU: E8400 oc'd to 3.2ghz

6 gig RAM

640GB HDD (7200rpm IIRC) (I don't torrent or anything, so there's not tons of large video files etc)

Win 7

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Then 13"-15" laptops will probably work out.

Core i5 ~2.0 Ghz

8GB RAM

500GB-1TB HDD or a 256GB SSD if you configure your desktop to share as mike suggested. You could go with a SSHD if you want performance like a SSD but with HDD storage capacity.

Again, it might help to know what screen size you're thinking about.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I plan to keep my desktop and use it primarily. But upgrading the CPU would require a new motherboard, so not until "the next breakthrough" or something. Current specs:

CPU: E8400 oc'd to 3.2ghz

6 gig RAM

640GB HDD (7200rpm IIRC) (I don't torrent or anything, so there's not tons of large video files etc)

Win 7

Ok, it's most likely the CPU, since I think I had that exact same CPU... two computers ago. It's a Wolfsdale Core 2 Duo, right? You'd also likely get a bump with a SATA III compatible motherboard and hard drive.

Not exactly sure what you mean by breakthrough... Intel's still on the whole Core i thing, but they're on something like the 4th generation. And Intel works on a tick-tock cycle where they alternate major revisions and refinements, so even if you accept that two versions of Core i are just minor bumps, that's still two major upgrades.

In any case, I don't think it's time for an upgrade on your desktop, I think it's time for a new desktop.

In the mean time, though, you could try disabling indexing (either right-click the C: drive, select properties, and on the general tab make sure "allow files on this drive to be indexed..." at the bottom isn't checked, or open a run box, type services.msc, find "Windows Search" and set the startup type to "disabled.")

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...