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Aircraft Vs Thread 5


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What I liked most about those Ekanoplane photos that Jeleinen posted is the juxtaposition of the plane along with the environment it's being held on. Both convey a feeling of post-apocalyptic decay and nostalgia - seemingly ripped straight out of the Half Life 2 or STALKER game.

You would think that such an incredibly machine would be a big tourism draw, yet the photographs depict a landscape almost devoid of human life - and that a zombie will pop out of the plane at any moment. (I'm sure it gets a lot of visitors, it's just the way the photos were taken that I'm commenting on:p ).

Edited by Ghost Train
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I found this kit at my local hobby shop for a reasonable price, and I naturally picked it up and started building it. On this particular Tomcat, were the glove vanes deleted, or were they still present? They're called for in the manual (both open and closed), but I'm not sure, as only production F-14As have the vanes present. The B's I think don't have them, and I know the D's dont.

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Do you plan to use those exact markings? Because that's the original, one-of-a-kind F-14B prototype, and it's an utter freak, physically, in nearly every way. Being one of the first F-14's ever built, it does have glove vanes. They might even still work.

Checking the instructions at 1999.co.jp, I think they're wrong in at least a few spots---that one doesn't have the bumps under the gloves, shouldn't use the N1 gear door, and nose probe, gun vents, and chin pod will all be determined by what year you're modeling. (and even engines---as it sits now, it has TF30's---yet still retains GE-style nibs that don't fit well)

They basically just gave you the instructions for a normal F-14B---which will work for every F-14B ever except that exact one. (Hasegawa always shows working glove vanes, no matter what variant/year the kit is for).

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Do you plan to use those exact markings? Because that's the original, one-of-a-kind F-14B prototype, and it's an utter freak, physically, in nearly every way. Being one of the first F-14's ever built, it does have glove vanes. They might even still work.

Checking the instructions at 1999.co.jp, I think they're wrong in at least a few spots---that one doesn't have the bumps under the gloves, shouldn't use the N1 gear door, and nose probe, gun vents, and chin pod will all be determined by what year you're modeling. (and even engines---as it sits now, it has TF30's---yet still retains GE-style nibs that don't fit well)

They basically just gave you the instructions for a normal F-14B---which will work for every F-14B ever except that exact one. (Hasegawa always shows working glove vanes, no matter what variant/year the kit is for).

David! I'm shocked! You, calling a F-14 a "freak"?! I've never heard such language from you! :p

My kit came with the F110 engines, not the TF-30s. I do plan on using those markings. It's what drew me to the kit in the first place. So, which parts should I use from what came with the kit? By your suggestions, I should skip using parts E21 in step 9 and in step 15 I should use the B parts instead of the N parts.

I plan on doing an earlier version of the Super tomcat, so I should use the older style of gunvents (they're there too). I'm guessing the longer probe would be required too, as well as either the IF or TV chin pod.

Edit: I was going over that F-14 book you sent to me David, and on page 71 is a nice shot of a F-14B in similar markings. On this one there's no chin pod, there's a tomcat logo on the tails, and it says F-14B on the tails instead of Super Tomcat... I think this is getting a little more complicated...

Edited by VF-19
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Yup. 157986 has one heck of a history. Basically, it has carried nearly every part of an A, B, and D, at one time or another---but rarely in a "correct" assortment. You really do need to find a couple of photos taken about the same time, and base your kit on that.

As it is "right now" it's REALLY a mish-mash and I wouldn't recommend building it like that--however, that is what the vast majority of pics show, as it's on the Intrepid now so be wary of any really clear, good pics---they're probably recent!

Also--don't build it TOO early. That'd require some very rare engines, like the F401 or F101. Actually, those may be the only engines which use the long nose probe. I'll have to check my books.

You've got F110 engines, so that determines what you're going to build of course. I just have to see exactly how you should build it, as I don't think the kit instructions are right at all.

Step 9--correct, but also shave off the bump that is molded on the underside of the glove---it's forward and outboard of where E21 goes.

Does this kit have the bumps that are RIGHT in front of the glove vanes? If so, they need to go as well. (probably---that plane currently has them, but I bet it didn't in the 80's---another thing I have to check)

Step 15--correct.

Step 16---may have to use E18 instead of E19. Will have to check.

Thought of what it's going to carry yet? This'll be your only chance to put a HARM on a Tomcat: http://www.tomcat521.com/tomcat/walkaround...grumman-14l.jpg

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Found a pic with GE engines and the big probe:

http://aerofiles.com/grum-f14b.jpg

(can't tell if they're F101 or F110's though---they're VERY similar)

Edit---some good pics here, a few I've never seen before: http://www.afwing.com/intro/f14/story-4.htm

One with HARMs and bombs (with a D-style chinpod though), and one with the vanes out.

I would actually say this particular photo is probably the best to base the kit off of: http://www.afwing.com/images/f14/story/f14b110.jpg Note the chinpod.

Also, just knowing what/why the F-14D is how it is, I would guess that while testing F110's in the mid-80's, 157986 did NOT have the bumps ahead of the glove vanes.

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How far can a 787's wings bend? THIS far:

787ultimatewing-2.jpg

::edit:: Apparently, they did not bend them 'till they broke. Which is unusual, I can't recall an airliner which didn't have its wings bent to destruction to find out the absolute limit. Though both the A330 and A380 had them snap BEFORE 150% was reached. For the 787 they only bent them until they hit 150% above design load, which is all that's required for certification. Now, it's unlikely they would have hit even 155% before breaking, but still---people like to see them snap! Like this:

http://www.guzer.com/videos/boeing777_wing_test.php 777 got to 154%.

Now, the 767 and 777 are both reported to have had the fuselage start twisting and rippling from the strain once you get around 150%. (in short, the wing-to-fuselage connection is stronger than the fuselage itself--I think)

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