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Bandai 1/72 fully transform able VF-1 plastic kit for Macross 30th Ann

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Looking forward to seeing this thing, October 25th?

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If this ends up not being too expensive I will get one to do a purple Zentraedi Scheme

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I'd buy one just to build for the fun of it. Probably TV version Hikaru---the simplest scheme with the fewest parts that could have paint/decal scratching. Though a DYRL scheme would be only slightly more complex.

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Sweet! I begged the Macross guy at Bandai for a 1/32 scale PG Super Valk at Anime Expo but I'll take 1/72. Having just finished a Hasegawa Valk and picked up the Wave Valk I'll be very interested to see what Bandai does. I figure it will be like HGUC-quality (not sure if anybody here build Gundam ???) Now if I can just get somebody to IMPORT them so I don't have to pay the @$%!# yen conversion and shipping...

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I'm hoping this will be molded in color so any scratched paint will just look like wear and tear (unless of course you're doing a custom paint scheme). - MT

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Any news update so far? Can't wait to see the details~

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Those lines look really out-of-scale deep trenches and it looks like its not molded in colour as there's no separation for the black lines on the wings or chestplate.

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Well.. molding panels in color sure. Stripes, probably not.

I'm just going to be very interested in seeing two things:

1. How they fold the tails

2. How they keep the legs from sagging

It'll be a fun little experiment at least.

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Considering how every VF-1 has the exact same wing-stripe shape AFAIK, and how they've done striped/colored Gundam shields before, they certainly COULD make that one part a separate piece, and it'd work for every scheme there is. And they should IMHO, as a swing-wing is just ASKING for any paint or decal or sticker to get ruined the first time you move it.

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Considering how every VF-1 has the exact same wing-stripe shape

*every DYRL VF-1?

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...as a swing-wing is just ASKING for any paint or decal or sticker to get ruined the first time you move it.
Now sing along with me kids: "Moveable parts and scale models never should mix."

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Now sing along with me kids: "Moveable parts and scale models never should mix."

:D Took the words right out of my mouth!

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Now sing along with me kids: "Moveable parts and scale models never should mix."

Not even the swing wings?

I don't think even Hasegawa omits that element even though most modelers simply lock them into one position.

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Actually, the 1/48 Hasegawa F-14 has "positionable" wings, not movable ones. I suppose you could just leave them unglued, but I don't think they're linked. And anyway, if you build the plane with the wings out and flaps hanging down, they're not going anywhere.

Hasegawa is one of the few kits (if not the only one) to include multiple sets of the sealing bladders that sit behind the wings, and streamline the space behind the wing glove when the wings are extended. Using the correct ones for extended wings will keep you from ever folding them.

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Hasegawa is one of the few kits (if not the only one) to include multiple sets of the sealing bladders that sit behind the wings, and streamline the space behind the wing glove when the wings are extended. Using the correct ones for extended wings will keep you from ever folding them.

Yup. Any model/toy of an F-14 etc with working wings----the glove seals are always in the "wings back" position, which leads to gaps when the wings are forward. The worst example is usually the F-111, they will have a massive chasm when the wings are forward. (in real life, the B-1B would be even worse, but even quasi-accurate B-1B's are rare so they kinda gloss over the issue by making the whole glove totally wrong in every position)

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I really hope this ends up at least MG quality. Then I will buy a few...

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Actually, the 1/48 Hasegawa F-14 has "positionable" wings, not movable ones.

my biggest disappointment and turn-off with the 1/72 HASE F-14 that i picked up a year ago.

i had much more fun with the 1/48 REVELL i picked up not long after. at least it has movable swing wings.

honestly, why hasn't anyone engineered a halfway decent F-14 finished replica or model kit

with honest to goodness functional landing gear, amongst other functioning details? you think there'd be a market for it...

at any rate, i'll probably be biting on this new variable kit, at least for sentimental value, as the ROBOTECH CHANGERS "VEXAR" iteration

of the original IMAI/BANDAI Focker -1S was my first ever VF, given to me in BADLY finished form, by a nephew back in the very-late 1980's...

((NOT my original aforementioned late-80's kit, of course, merely a copy i came across (thanks to a fellow MWer) a few years ago...))

VF-1S-ROBOTECHVEXAR-10-24-12.jpg

ROBOTECHVEXAR2.jpg

Edited by Shaorin

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You know, I think these transformable play-model type kits would be better served being discussed in the toy section rather than the model section. I know they're technically model kits in the sense that you have to build them, but there's clearly not a lot of love for these types of snap kits in the general modeling community, and the main demographic for these is most likely going to be people who want a small and cheap alternatives to Yamato 1/60's and bandai DX's.

I'm not a regular on the MW Forums and as a model builder I kind of trip out on people taking "toys" like the Yamato Valks and treating them like models by modding and repainting them and then doing weathering, etc...

There's a whole spectrum of model builders out there and the rivet-counting IPMS-type model builders probabaly wouldn't let the customized Yamato/Bandai/Whatever "toy" Valks into their contests. I'm less concerned with things like that, although I would (strictly in terms of contest judging, not in terms of whether I personally think it is cool or impressive) knock anything that wasn't completely repainted and didn't have all seam lines and screws fixed/hidden. It's the model builder mentality and it's what separates toys from model kits in our minds. A decent model builder should be able to produce something much nicer than an off-the-shelf toy.

With that in mind I'd say Bandai model kits are toys only so much as you choose to play with them and do not choose to apply model-building skills to them. I take even my most simple Bandai kits and cut the parts off the tree with a tool made by Tamiya for that purpose and then sand down the remaining nub of plastic. I glue any parts together that have a seam that isn't a natural panel line on the "real thing" and use putty and sanding to hide the seam. I prime and repeat the process until there's no trace of the seam left. I then restore any panel lines that were lost under the putty. I fully paint every square mm of the model. I apply a gloss clearcoat and then decals (aftermarket waterslide ones, never the crappy stickers in the kit) and then another gloss coat and then a panel line wash and then maybe another gloss coat and some weathering and then a flat coat and then maybe even some more weathering.

I treat Bandai models the same way as I do my Tamiya real-world airplane kits or my Hasegawa Valkyries. I'll freely admit that serious model builders are in the minority of those that buy Bandai kits, but the fact that people use them like toys doesn't make them toys. Does Bandai's really thoughtful engineering that tends to eliminate seam lines and break parts down so that they can be painted with minimal masking make building them easier? Absolutley. Does Tamiya try to do the same thing. Yes, although it's harder for them since real-world subjects often don't lend themselves to such feats of engineering. Also, even though a Bandai kit may be poseable and even transformable, I ony repose it minimally after building it and I probably build it with one mode in mind and never transform it. There's one place I think Hasegawa has the advantage, although their VF-1 fighters suffer from compartmentalization since the parts breakdown has to accomodate both normal and super/strike fighters.

Anyway, I'm really looking forward to Bandai's Valkyries, although whether I buy any will have to do with their proportions (and Bandai proportions in their Gundam mainstay has varied wildly over the last 10 years) and their engineering. If the Valks aren't any easier to build than the Hasegawa Valks or really look significantly worse than them or are too "floppy" due to transformation then I'll stay away.

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A decent model builder should be able to produce something much nicer than an off-the-shelf toy.

This has always been my personal aim. For me, a model is a display piece.

However, I think we need to acknowledge the fact that people build for different reasons. I buy my daughters models occassionally. They build for the fun of it, and then often they play with the model like a toy. It doesn't last long, and ends up in pieces on a shelf, but that's not the point. I suspect there are plenty of grown ups who like to play with their models too, and these will cater for them. What's not possible to to do fine paint finishes and expect them to last. A couple of transformations and you'll have paint chips and rubbing all over the place. I learned this to my displeasure with a couple of those 'Robotech' kits back in the day.

What I'm looking forward to with this Bandai release is the abililty to maybe do a good Gerwalk pose, and lock it in place.

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yeah, i've been meaning to pick one of those up for myself, they're just too adorable♥

furthermore, i understand that i should be able to swap parts between her and the KOTO MEGA MAN "Roll"

that i already have;

roll-chan-everything-in-the-box-1293441602544.jpg

Roll-chan7-21-121.jpg

Roll-chan7-21-122.jpg

Edited by Shaorin

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as the ROBOTECH CHANGERS "VEXAR" iteration of the original IMAI/BANDAI Focker -1S was my first ever VF, given to me in BADLY finished form, by a nephew back in the very-late 1980's... ((NOT my original aforementioned late-80's kit, of course, merely a copy i came across (thanks to a fellow MWer) a few years ago...))

My first Valkyrie was the ROBOTECH Changers ORBOT (VF-1J)

I was only 8 or 9 and did an awful job but it was fun!

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I have to agree with what's been said about this type of model, which is to say that it's more in how you modeler builds them than how they were designed. I model almost exclusively mechs- gundams, super robot taisen, macross, what-have you, and I don't consider a mech model finished until I've glued, sanded, eliminated seamlines, airbrushed, added whatever decals I feel like, etc. If I buy one of these new bandai kits, I'll do the same.

Yeah, a lot of people just snap-build these, but there's model cars and airplanes people can buy and just snap together to, so IDK. It seems unfair to just dismiss these kits.

I'll be looking forward to seeing what this kit comes out to look like- I'm a huge fan of the old 1/72 transformable imai kit despite it's glaring problems, and it'll be fun to compare.

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Isn't it Oct 25 in japan right now???? Wheres the update??? LOL

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Just looked. Still says "Coming Soon".

I guess I'm one of the few who is not enthused about this release. After the disappointment I felt with their treatment of the Frontier line, I really have no desire for a new Bandai Macross kit.

I do have some of the classic kits though, that I'll have fun building.

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The site's been updated. Basically says they'll continually update the site with development progress on this kit.

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Well that was a let down...I want to see it!!!

Here is a Google translate...

Nice to meet you.

Uchida is Bandai Hobby Division Planning and Development Team.

Has been responsible for the development of plastic models, such as "Macross F" series.

Well, the machine was held last Sun the "All Japan Model Hobby Show 2012" was finally happy to announce the development of a "1/72VF-1 Perfect Transformation Model."

I hope we can watch together on this site until the product launch also means because everyone will continue to disseminate information in this blog from now until the product launch.

Thank you!

I think this time we would like to talk about the recent history and the development of the VF-1 in the first round of that blog memorable.

When in 2008, we have developed products "1/72 VF-25 Messiah Valkyrie" Macross F series, I was able to achieve a complete transformation and form a complex three-Battroid Gau~oku Fighter. I began to feel a desire to try to make the VF-1's premier force in the wake of this current technology, continue to evolve, Bandai's plastic model.

And, it was decided that the timing of this Macross 30th anniversary, started to develop as fully as commemoration of Bandai Plastic deformation.

VF-25 is the deformation mechanism has been included have been created in CG, we will either deform maintained without collapse of proportion how the VF-1 is not the case has become a point of goods this time. (Even at the venue Hobby Show, I had a lot of the voice of our customers as well as we have to talk!)

In addition, we would like to emphasize is also in the form of action Battroid gimmick and movement of the legs in the configuration instead of just deform. I think many things have also considered other, because there are a lot of things still being verified, the future, we would like to introduce this site.

It is a recent and

The other day, I received supervised by director Kawamori Fighter mode image of the first CG shot memorable.

A CG image which you can see at this time, It was also used in the panel Hobby Show.

I received a check in the form of a prototype fighter mode in the absence of solid yet.

Received a lot of advice from the director, so we further improved from here, I think I want you to stay tuned VF-1 to evolve.

We witnessed your voice is also erase people Editor Hobby Japan, Dengeki Hobby Magazine, model graphics, three-dimensional objects next to the supervision of the director Kawamori sprinkled, and point to a product demand and challenges I think that would be a frank exchange of opinions.

Thank you cheer because I had become long, we would like to meet the expectations of everyone in the product.

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my biggest disappointment and turn-off with the 1/72 HASE F-14 that i picked up a year ago.

i had much more fun with the 1/48 REVELL i picked up not long after. at least it has movable swing wings.

honestly, why hasn't anyone engineered a halfway decent F-14 finished replica or model kit

with honest to goodness functional landing gear, amongst other functioning details? you think there'd be a market for it...

Because then its not a model kit. Most modelers view the Hasegawa F-14 as the best in its scale and its considered a classic. Most don't touch their creations... I've probably picked it up less than 5 times since I built mine. To me the most important thing is accuracy. For example I had this box art:

7162.jpg

And this is what I built (and yes the pitot is missing and the sensors are not painted, but both of those have been rectified since.)

4X2.jpg

When I buy something I want to build it so it looks like the most accurate representation of the subject matter. So to me, movable wings are a gimmick, one that introduces compromises that ruin the final finish of the model. Now, you want your kit for something different; posing and moving around, which is completely fine, but its really not a model in a traditional sense.

I'm not a regular on the MW Forums and as a model builder I kind of trip out on people taking "toys" like the Yamato Valks and treating them like models by modding and repainting them and then doing weathering, etc...

There's a whole spectrum of model builders out there and the rivet-counting IPMS-type model builders probabaly wouldn't let the customized Yamato/Bandai/Whatever "toy" Valks into their contests. I'm less concerned with things like that, although I would (strictly in terms of contest judging, not in terms of whether I personally think it is cool or impressive) knock anything that wasn't completely repainted and didn't have all seam lines and screws fixed/hidden. It's the model builder mentality and it's what separates toys from model kits in our minds. A decent model builder should be able to produce something much nicer than an off-the-shelf toy.

With that in mind I'd say Bandai model kits are toys only so much as you choose to play with them and do not choose to apply model-building skills to them. I take even my most simple Bandai kits and cut the parts off the tree with a tool made by Tamiya for that purpose and then sand down the remaining nub of plastic. I glue any parts together that have a seam that isn't a natural panel line on the "real thing" and use putty and sanding to hide the seam. I prime and repeat the process until there's no trace of the seam left. I then restore any panel lines that were lost under the putty. I fully paint every square mm of the model. I apply a gloss clearcoat and then decals (aftermarket waterslide ones, never the crappy stickers in the kit) and then another gloss coat and then a panel line wash and then maybe another gloss coat and some weathering and then a flat coat and then maybe even some more weathering.

I treat Bandai models the same way as I do my Tamiya real-world airplane kits or my Hasegawa Valkyries. I'll freely admit that serious model builders are in the minority of those that buy Bandai kits, but the fact that people use them like toys doesn't make them toys. Does Bandai's really thoughtful engineering that tends to eliminate seam lines and break parts down so that they can be painted with minimal masking make building them easier? Absolutley. Does Tamiya try to do the same thing. Yes, although it's harder for them since real-world subjects often don't lend themselves to such feats of engineering. Also, even though a Bandai kit may be poseable and even transformable, I ony repose it minimally after building it and I probably build it with one mode in mind and never transform it. There's one place I think Hasegawa has the advantage, although their VF-1 fighters suffer from compartmentalization since the parts breakdown has to accomodate both normal and super/strike fighters.

Anyway, I'm really looking forward to Bandai's Valkyries, although whether I buy any will have to do with their proportions (and Bandai proportions in their Gundam mainstay has varied wildly over the last 10 years) and their engineering. If the Valks aren't any easier to build than the Hasegawa Valks or really look significantly worse than them or are too "floppy" due to transformation then I'll stay away.

Well, it wouldn't win versus a hasegawa without extreme levels of work because of how the Ipms rules are set up.... which is what you accurately discuss. However they are becoming a very common sight at competitions with people doing the work to build them into actual models rather than toys. Given you're interested in building them as models, I'm somewhat doubtful Bandai will give you what you want, given the challenges of building it into three modes.

Edited by Noyhauser

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I'm willing to give this a shot if the proportions are nice. I think they did a nice job with the 1:72 VF-25's. I approached the kit with "realistic expectations." No one in their right minds would expect those nice layers of paint and decals to survive repeated transformations. If you are a semi-intelligent person you will realize that you're paying for the option to build it in either one of three modes, despite the fact that it was billed as a transformable model.

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