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F-ZeroOne

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About F-ZeroOne

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    Alaska Base Survivor

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    F-ZeroOne

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  1. I remember when the first images of "Turn-A Gundam" were released. How we laughed. Great Tominos ghost, we exclaimed, its got a 'TACHE! How wrong we were. Thank you, Mr. Mead, for what is now my favourite "Gundam" design.
  2. Bison, because who doesn't love a "Street Fighter: II" reference... (yes, I know!).
  3. Just to reassure people, no hedgehogs were harmed in the making of hedgehog flavoured crisps. I think. I mean, sometimes you'd get the odd one that served a dual function as a toothpick but... Now I think about it, the NATO "If we give them silly names they'll sound less of a threat" possibility extended to helicopters too - Hip, Hind, Hokum (that one always felt deliberate)...
  4. Remind me to tell you about Hedgehog flavour crisps sometime... ...er, anyway, flyey stuff! NATO callsigns are probably assigned for some of the same reasons they used codenames for Japanese aircraft in World War II; if you say "Felon" everyone knows you're referring to the Russian stealth fighter; if you say "Su-57" you have to wait while everyone tries to remember if thats the one with the canard, or their regional business jet, or didn't they try and make a floatplane once? It also, and I'm guessing here, means that everyone uses the same language designation rather than whatever the local translation of "Sukhoi" or "57" is...
  5. For those of you who can access the BBC iPlayer service, they currently have a three part series about HMS Her Maj, excuse me, HMS Queen Elizabeth, "Britians Biggest Warship". Its the usual soap-opera style "military slice of life" stuff (young sailors on shore leave have a few drinks too many, get into trouble with the local plod - excuse me, law enforcement etc) interspersed with interesting footage of the F-35B Lightning II being tested off her decks (particularly in episode 2). And if you want any further evidence that HMS Her Maj is a British warship, its the fact that her Captain (at the time of filming) has a drawer full of Salt "n" Vinegar crisps...
  6. Something else I would expect is considered in these designs. I doubt people who design helicopters for a living somehow forget that the rotor blades are part of the machine too.
  7. I would imagine, considering the efforts they seem to have gone to to shape the fuselage to at least reduce the radar signature, that they've al;so consdired the effects of the wings. Do they have a slight sweep? I don't think I've seen that on a "winged" helicopter before.
  8. Its already taken, sorry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xi'an_JH-7
  9. There was a "Flapjack", of a kind. It just wasn't Russian... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vought_XF5U
  10. Funny you should say that, I've seen promotional videos which have the Skylon moving past very "Thunderbirds" looking spaceport hangar buildings, which was almost certainly deliberate. The name is also of an era: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skylon_(Festival_of_Britain)
  11. That image immediately reminded me of the stillborn British 1980s "HOTOL" project; a couple of people that worked on that that are now working on "Skylon", which is a similar concept: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Aerospace_HOTOL https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skylon_(spacecraft)
  12. The line about "The past is written" I find a little ironic, considering the events of "First Contact"...
  13. Yeah, I get the engine and prop are missing. But the cockpit looks like a kids fairground ride in that photo!
  14. Just struck me... is that JU-87 actual size? It might just be the camera angle, but it looks tiny!
  15. Heh, with remarkable timing theres just been a documentary on the BBC4 channel here about the Spitfire and it actually featured one that the current owner claimed was "98% original parts" - largely because it had never been used in combat! (the aircraft had also been "signed" by Mary Ellis, a wartime Womens Air Transport Auxiliary pilot, when she first flew it and she gets to sign it again at the age of 100...!). I know that one problem with "original parts" on Spitfires is that apparently the wartime magnesium screws they used actually corrode the airframe over time, so these usually have to be replaced.
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